Micronucleus test

Assessment of the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic potential of Acrocomia aculeata in rats

G. K. Traesel, Castro, L. H. A., Silva, P. V. B., Muzzi, R. M., Kassuya, C. A. L., Arena, A. C., and Oesterreich, S. A., Assessment of the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic potential of Acrocomia aculeata in rats, vol. 14, pp. 585-596, 2015.

Acrocomia aculeata (Jacq.) Lodd. ex Mart. is a plant species commonly used as a foodstuff and also for treating diseases, since it contains high concentrations of antioxidant compounds and monounsaturated fatty acids. Considering its ethnopharmacological relevance, the aim of the present study was to assess the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic effects of an oil extracted from the pulp of A. aculeata (OPAC) in rats. In addition, a chromatographic characterization of the fatty acids present in OPAC was performed.

Association of GSTM1 and GSTT1 with ageing in auto repair shop workers

S. A. Eshkoor, Marashi, S. J., Ismail, P., Rahman, S. A., Mirinargesi, M., Adon, M. Y., and Devan, R. V., Association of GSTM1 and GSTT1 with ageing in auto repair shop workers, vol. 11, pp. 1486-1496, 2012.

We evaluated the possible influence of glutathione S-transferase mu (GSTM1) and glutathione S-transferase theta (GSTT1) genes on genetic damage due to occupational exposure, which contributes to accelerate ageing. This study was conducted on 120 car auto repair workshop workers exposed to occupational hazards and 120 controls without this kind of exposure. The null and non-null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes were determined by multiplex PCR.

Genotoxicity of the medicinal plant Maytenus robusta in mammalian cells in vivo

T. M. Raymundo, Favilla, M., Niero, R., Andrade, S. F., and Maistro, E. L., Genotoxicity of the medicinal plant Maytenus robusta in mammalian cells in vivo, vol. 11, pp. 2847-2854, 2012.

Plants belonging to the Celastraceae family have been used in traditional medicine for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcerogenic properties, among others. Maytenus ilicifolia is the principal species of this family, and is used in the treatment of gastric ulcers. However, owing to its inadequate management in Brazil, the species is becoming extinct and is being substituted with Maytenus robusta, which also displays gastroprotective activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of M.

Assessment of genotoxic, cytotoxic, and protective effects of Salacia crassifolia (Mart. Ex. Schult.) G. Don. stem bark fractions in mice

C. C. Carneiro, Silva, C. R., Menezes, A. C. S., Pérez, C. N., and Chen-Chen, L., Assessment of genotoxic, cytotoxic, and protective effects of Salacia crassifolia (Mart. Ex. Schult.) G. Don. stem bark fractions in mice, vol. 12, pp. 2167-2177, 2013.

Salacia crassifolia (Mart. Ex. Schult.) G. Don., popularly known in Brazil as "bacupari", "cascudo", and "saputá", is a shrub of the Celastraceae family that is unique to the Brazilian Cerrado region. In folk medicine, this plant has been mainly used to treat skin cancer and gastric ulcers. In the present study, the genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic effects of S. crassifolia stem bark fractions (hexane, ethyl acetate, and hydroalcoholic extracts) were evaluated using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test.

Antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic activity of Duguetia furfuracea in bacteria and mice

C. R. Silva, Vieira, P. M., and Chen-Chen, L., Antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic activity of Duguetia furfuracea in bacteria and mice, vol. 12, pp. 3718-3725, 2013.

Duguetia furfuracea (St. Hil.) Benth & Hook f. (1862), popularly known as "sofre-do-rim-quem-quer" and "araticum-seco", is a shrub of the Annonaceae family that grows in several regions of Brazil. Infusions of its leaves and twigs are used in folk medicine to treat rheumatism and renal colic, whereas the seed powder is mixed with water to treat pediculosis. Studies on the plant have reported biological activities with cytotoxic, antitumoral, trypanocidal, leishmanicidal, antiplasmodial, and antiprotozoal effects.

Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Rosmarinus officinalis (Labiatae) essential oil in mammalian cells in vivo

E. L. Maistro, Mota, S. F., Lima, E. B., Bernardes, B. M., and Goulart, F. C., Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Rosmarinus officinalis (Labiatae) essential oil in mammalian cells in vivo, vol. 9, pp. 2113-2122, 2010.

Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) oil is widely used by the cosmetic, food, and pharmaceutical industries as a fragrance component of soaps, creams, lotions, and perfumes. Although it is popular, potential harmful side-effects of the oil have been described. We investigated the genotoxic and mutagenic potential of essential oil of R. officinalis in rodents, using comet, micronucleus and chromosome aberration assays. The animals were treated by gavage with one of three dosages of rosemary oil (300, 1000 or 2000 mg/kg).

In vitro genotoxicity assessment of caffeic, cinnamic and ferulic acids

E. L. Maistro, Angeli, J. P. F., Andrade, S. F., and Mantovani, M. S., In vitro genotoxicity assessment of caffeic, cinnamic and ferulic acids, vol. 10, pp. 1130-1140, 2011.

Phenols are a large and diverse class of compounds, many of which occur naturally in a variety of food plants; they exhibit a wide range of biological effects, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, hepatoprotective, antithrombotic, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, and vasodilatory actions. We examined the genotoxic and clastogenic potential of three phenolic compounds: caffeic, cinnamic and ferulic acids, using the comet and micronucleus assays in vitro. Drug-metabolizing rat hepatoma tissue cells (HTCs) were used.

Absence of mutagenicity effects of Psidium cattleyanum Sabine (Myrtaceae) extract on peripheral blood and bone marrow cells of mice

T. D. A. Costa, Vieira, S., Andrade, S. F., and Maistro, E. L., Absence of mutagenicity effects of Psidium cattleyanum Sabine (Myrtaceae) extract on peripheral blood and bone marrow cells of mice, vol. 7, pp. 679-686, 2008.

Cattley guava (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine) is a native fruit of Brazil that is popular both as a sweet food and for its reputed therapeutic properties. We examined whether it could damage DNA using the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) and the micronucleus test in leukocytes and in bone marrow cells of mice. P. cattleyanum leaf extract was tested at concentrations of 1000, 1500 and 2000 mg/kg. N-nitroso-N-ethylurea was used as a positive control.

Potential control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) with Piper aduncum L. (Piperaceae) extracts demonstrated by chromosomal biomarkers and toxic effects on interphase nuclei

M. S. Rafael, Hereira-Rojas, W. J., Roper, J. J., Nunomura, S. M., and Tadei, W. P., Potential control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) with Piper aduncum L. (Piperaceae) extracts demonstrated by chromosomal biomarkers and toxic effects on interphase nuclei, vol. 7, pp. 772-781, 2008.

Dillapiol, a phenylpropanoid isolate from essential oils of leaves of Piper aduncum (Piperaceae), has insecticidal, fungicidal and antimicrobial activities. The insecticidal activity of dil lapiol was tested in vivo on the larvae and pupae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue. Specifically, the effect of dillapiol on the formation of micronuclei and chromosome aberrations was analyzed.

Mutagenicity of the Musa paradisiaca (Musaceae) fruit peel extract in mouse peripheral blood cells in vivo

C. U. B. Andrade, Perazzo, F. F., and Maistro, E. L., Mutagenicity of the Musa paradisiaca (Musaceae) fruit peel extract in mouse peripheral blood cells in vivo, vol. 7, pp. 725-732, 2008.

Plants are a source of many biologically active products and nowadays they are of great interest to the pharmaceutical industry. In the present study, the mutagenic potential of the Musa paradisiaca fruit peel extract was assessed by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) and micronucleus assays. Animals were treated orally with three different concentrations of the extract (1000, 1500, and 2000 mg/kg body weight). Peripheral blood cells of Swiss mice were collected 24 h after treatment for the SCGE assay and 48 and 72 h for the micronucleus test.

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