Feed efficiency

Genome-wide association with residual body weight gain in Bos indicus cattle

M. H. A. Santana, Gomes, R. C., Utsunomiya, Y. T., Neves, H. H. R., Novais, F. J., Bonin, M. N., Fukumasu, H., Garcia, J. F., Alexandre, P. A., Junior, G. A. Oliveira, Coutinho, L. L., and Ferraz, J. B. S., Genome-wide association with residual body weight gain in Bos indicus cattle, vol. 14. pp. 5229-5233, 2015.

Weight gain is a key performance trait for beef cat­tle; however, attention should be given to the production costs for better profitability. Therefore, a feed efficiency trait based on per­formance can be an interesting approach to improve performance without increasing food costs. To identify candidate genes and ge­nomic regions associated with residual body weight gain (RWG), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 720 Nellore cattle using the GRAMMAR-Gamma association test.

Mitochondrial gene expression in the liver and muscle of high and low feed efficiency Japanese quail layers subjected to different environmental temperatures

D. M. Voltolini, Del Vesco, A. P., Gasparino, E., Guimarães, S. E. F., Neto, A. R. Oliveira, Batista, E., and Ton, A. P. S., Mitochondrial gene expression in the liver and muscle of high and low feed efficiency Japanese quail layers subjected to different environmental temperatures, vol. 13, pp. 4940-4948, 2014.

We evaluated the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III (COX III) mRNA expressions in the muscle and liver of Japanese quails presenting high and low feed efficiency (FE), and subjected them to three different environmental temperatures: comfort, heat stress (38°C), and cold stress (10°C). ANT mRNA expression was lower in the liver of heat-stressed animals. In the muscle, higher ANT and COX III mRNA expressions were observed in high-FE and cold-stressed animals.

Genetics of efficient feed utilization and national cattle evaluation: a review

D. H. Denny Crews, Jr., Genetics of efficient feed utilization and national cattle evaluation: a review, vol. 4. pp. 152-165, 2005.

Selection for the wide range of traits for which most beef breed associations calculate expected progeny differences focus on increasing the outputs of the production system, thereby increasing the genetic potential of cattle for reproductive rates, weights, growth rates, and end-product yield. Feed costs, however, represent a large proportion of the variable cost of beef production and genetic improvement programs for reducing input costs should include traits related to feed utilization.

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