Alopecia areata

Association between TAP1 gene polymorphisms and alopecia areata in a Korean population

H. K. Kim, Lee, H., Lew, B. L., Sim, W. Y., Kim, Y. O., Lee, S. W., Lee, S., Cho, I. K., Kwon, J. T., and Kim, H. J., Association between TAP1 gene polymorphisms and alopecia areata in a Korean population, vol. 14, pp. 18820-18827, 2015.

The transporter 1 ATP-binding cassette sub-family B (MDR/TAP) gene (TAP1) is located in the major histocompatibility complex class II region, and forms a heterodimer that plays a key role in endogenous antigen presentation pathways. Investigation of polymorphisms identified in these loci has revealed an association with several autoimmune disorders. Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disease resulting from T cell-induced damage to hair follicles.

Polymorphisms in the promoter regions of the CXCL1 and CXCL2 genes contribute to increased risk of alopecia areata in the Korean population

S. K. Kim, Chung, J. - H., Park, H. J., Kang, S. W., Lim, D. - J., Byun, S. H., Baek, D. G., Ko, H. Y., Lew, B. - L., Baik, H. H., and Sim, W. - Y., Polymorphisms in the promoter regions of the CXCL1 and CXCL2 genes contribute to increased risk of alopecia areata in the Korean population, vol. 14, pp. 9667-9674, 2015.

Alopecia areata (AA) is a common disease, which causes hair loss in humans. AA has a genetically complex inheritance. This study investigated the possible correlations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter regions of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (melanoma growth stimulating activity, alpha) (CXCL1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2) genes and the development of AA in the Korean population. Two hundred and thirty-five AA patients and 240 control subjects were recruited.

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