Africanized bees

Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera) have low infestation levels of the mite Varroa destructor in different ecological regions in Mexico

C. A. Medina-Flores, Guzmán-Novoa, E., Hamiduzzaman, M. M., Aréchiga-Flores, C. F., and López-Carlos, M. A., Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera) have low infestation levels of the mite Varroa destructor in different ecological regions in Mexico, vol. 13, pp. 7282-7293, 2014.

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies of African and European descent were compared for levels of Varroa destructor infestation in 3 different ecological regions in Mexico. The 300 colonies that were studied were located in subtropical, temperate sub-humid, and temperate dry climates. The morphotype and mitotype of adult bees as well as their rates of infestation by varroa mites were determined. Additionally, the number of combs with brood and covered with bees was recorded for each colony.

Maternal influence on the acceptance of virgin queens introduced into Africanized honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies

G. Moretto, Guerra, J. C. V., Kalvelage, H., and Espindola, E., Maternal influence on the acceptance of virgin queens introduced into Africanized honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies, vol. 3, pp. 441-445, 2004.

The oviposition potential of honey bee queens decreases with age, therefore it is important to replace old queens with younger ones on a periodic basis. However, queen replacement is problematic, especially in Africanized honey bee colonies, since many introduced queens are not accepted, and virgin queens are less easily accepted than are mated queens. We assessed the influence of genetic origin (queen mother) on the acceptance of queens, when they were introduced as virgins into Africanized honey bee colonies.

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