Research Article

Meta-analysis of epidemiological studies of association of P53 codon 72 polymorphism with bladder cancer

Published: August 17, 2010
Genet. Mol. Res. 9 (3) : 1599-1605 DOI: 10.4238/vol9-3gmr882

Abstract

Although there have been many studies investigating a possible association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and risk of bladder cancer, the results have been inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis of six epidemiological studies, which included 597 bladder cancer cases and 731 controls. Patients with bladder cancer had a significantly lower frequency of Pro/Arg [odds ratio (OR) = 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64-0.99], when compared to controls. Stratifying for race, we found that among Caucasians, patients with bladder cancer had a significantly higher frequency of Arg/Arg (OR = 1.64, 95%CI = 1.18-2.28) and a lower frequency of Pro/Arg (OR = 0.62, 95%CI = 0.44-0.86), compared to controls. Stratifying various studies by the stage of bladder cancer, we found that invasive bladder cancers had a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg (OR = 0.58, 95%CI = 0.36-0.93) and a higher frequency of Pro/Arg (OR = 0.62, 95%CI = 0.44-0.86) than did non-invasive bladder cancers. No significant association was found between this genotype and human papilloma virus. Based on our meta-analysis, we suggest that p53 codon 72 polymorphism is associated with bladder cancer and that genotypic distribution of this polymorphism varies with the stage of bladder cancer.

Although there have been many studies investigating a possible association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and risk of bladder cancer, the results have been inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis of six epidemiological studies, which included 597 bladder cancer cases and 731 controls. Patients with bladder cancer had a significantly lower frequency of Pro/Arg [odds ratio (OR) = 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64-0.99], when compared to controls. Stratifying for race, we found that among Caucasians, patients with bladder cancer had a significantly higher frequency of Arg/Arg (OR = 1.64, 95%CI = 1.18-2.28) and a lower frequency of Pro/Arg (OR = 0.62, 95%CI = 0.44-0.86), compared to controls. Stratifying various studies by the stage of bladder cancer, we found that invasive bladder cancers had a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg (OR = 0.58, 95%CI = 0.36-0.93) and a higher frequency of Pro/Arg (OR = 0.62, 95%CI = 0.44-0.86) than did non-invasive bladder cancers. No significant association was found between this genotype and human papilloma virus. Based on our meta-analysis, we suggest that p53 codon 72 polymorphism is associated with bladder cancer and that genotypic distribution of this polymorphism varies with the stage of bladder cancer.

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