Research Article

Preferred amino acids and thermostability

Published: December 30, 2003
Genet. Mol. Res. 2 (4) : 383-393
Cite this Article:
(2003). Preferred amino acids and thermostability. Genet. Mol. Res. 2(4): gmr0079.
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Abstract

Most organisms grow at temperatures from 20 to 50°C, but some prokaryotes, including Archaea and Bacteria, are capable of withstanding higher temperatures, from 60 to >100°C. Their biomolecules, especially proteins, must be sufficiently stable to function under these extreme conditions; however, the basis for thermostability remains elusive. We investigated the preferential usage of certain groupings of amino acids and codons in thermally adapted organisms, by comparative proteome analysis, using 28 complete genomes from 18 mesophiles (M), 4 thermophiles (T), and 6 hyperthermophiles (HT). Whenever the percent of glutamate (E) and lysine (K) increased in the HT proteomes, the percent of glutamine (Q) and histidine (H) decreased, so that the E + K/Q + H ratio was >4.5; it was

Most organisms grow at temperatures from 20 to 50°C, but some prokaryotes, including Archaea and Bacteria, are capable of withstanding higher temperatures, from 60 to >100°C. Their biomolecules, especially proteins, must be sufficiently stable to function under these extreme conditions; however, the basis for thermostability remains elusive. We investigated the preferential usage of certain groupings of amino acids and codons in thermally adapted organisms, by comparative proteome analysis, using 28 complete genomes from 18 mesophiles (M), 4 thermophiles (T), and 6 hyperthermophiles (HT). Whenever the percent of glutamate (E) and lysine (K) increased in the HT proteomes, the percent of glutamine (Q) and histidine (H) decreased, so that the E + K/Q + H ratio was >4.5; it was

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