Research Article

Genome-wide analysis of the maize (Zea may L.) CPP-like gene family and expression profiling under abiotic stress

Published: July 29, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(3): gmr8023 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15038023

Abstract

Cysteine-rich polycomb-like (CPP) proteins are members of a small family of transcription factors, which have been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis, rice, and soybean. In this study, we investigated CPP-like genes in the maize genome. The results revealed 13 putative CPP-like genes, which were found to encode 17 distinct transcripts and were distributed unequally on 7 of 10 maize chromosomes. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships showed that Arabidopsis, rice, and maize CPP-like transcription factors can be grouped into two subfamilies. We also used real-time RT-PCR to evaluate changes in the transcript levels of ZmCPP genes in response to abiotic stresses (heat, cold, salt, and drought stresses). These findings provide an overview of the evolution of the ZmCPP gene family, which will aid in the functional characterization of CPP-like genes in maize growth and development.

Cysteine-rich polycomb-like (CPP) proteins are members of a small family of transcription factors, which have been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis, rice, and soybean. In this study, we investigated CPP-like genes in the maize genome. The results revealed 13 putative CPP-like genes, which were found to encode 17 distinct transcripts and were distributed unequally on 7 of 10 maize chromosomes. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships showed that Arabidopsis, rice, and maize CPP-like transcription factors can be grouped into two subfamilies. We also used real-time RT-PCR to evaluate changes in the transcript levels of ZmCPP genes in response to abiotic stresses (heat, cold, salt, and drought stresses). These findings provide an overview of the evolution of the ZmCPP gene family, which will aid in the functional characterization of CPP-like genes in maize growth and development.

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