Research Article

Association between the WRAP53 gene rs2287499 C>G polymorphism and cancer risk: A meta-analysis

Published: July 25, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(3): gmr7976 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15037976

Abstract

The TP53 5'-untranslated region flanking the gene WRAP53 (also known as WDR79 and TCAB1) has been hypothesized to be associated with cancer risk due to its critical function in regulating p53 levels. In this review, we analyzed the association between the WRAP53 gene rs2287499 C>G polymorphism and risk of cancer using five case-control studies, comprising seven datasets. All analyses were performed using RevMan software. In the overall analysis, no significant association between rs2287499 and risk of cancer was found. We then conducted subgroup tests, stratifying the data by cancer type, ethnicity, sample source, and quality score. Only the brain and breast cancer subgroups returned significant results, but with conflicting implications. Our concerns regarding this are discussed in detail. In conclusion, the rs2287499 polymorphism may be associated with risk of cancer. Further studies taking into consideration a broader range of cancer types and different ethnicities are warranted.

The TP53 5'-untranslated region flanking the gene WRAP53 (also known as WDR79 and TCAB1) has been hypothesized to be associated with cancer risk due to its critical function in regulating p53 levels. In this review, we analyzed the association between the WRAP53 gene rs2287499 C>G polymorphism and risk of cancer using five case-control studies, comprising seven datasets. All analyses were performed using RevMan software. In the overall analysis, no significant association between rs2287499 and risk of cancer was found. We then conducted subgroup tests, stratifying the data by cancer type, ethnicity, sample source, and quality score. Only the brain and breast cancer subgroups returned significant results, but with conflicting implications. Our concerns regarding this are discussed in detail. In conclusion, the rs2287499 polymorphism may be associated with risk of cancer. Further studies taking into consideration a broader range of cancer types and different ethnicities are warranted.

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