Research Article

Association between monoamine oxidase B A644G polymorphism and Parkinson’s disease risk: a meta-analysis in the Chinese population

Published: July 14, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr8349 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15028349
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Abstract

Although various individual studies have evaluated the correlation between monoamine oxidase B (MAOB), polymorphism, and Parkinson’s disease (PD), the results remain inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis in the Chinese population to provide comprehensive data on the association between the MAOB polymorphism and PD. Eligible studies were identified via databases such as PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biology Medicine, throughout November 2015. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strengths of these associations. Eight studies documenting a total of 1385 cases of PD and 1426 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was found between the MAOB A644G polymorphism and PD risk in the Chinese population. However, in subgroup analyses, where results were stratified by geographical areas and source of controls, increased risk for PD in Northern China was observed (allele A vs G: OR = 1.33, 95%CI = 1.11-1.58; AA vs GG: OR = 1.46, 95%CI = 1.09-1.97; AA + AG vs GG: OR = 1.42, 95%CI = 1.06-1.90). Similarly, population-based studies also showed significant association between the MAOB A644G polymorphism and PD risk among different populations (allele A vs G: OR = 1.29, 95%CI = 1.11-1.51; AA vs GG: OR = 1.41, 95%CI = 1.09-1.82; AA + AG vs GG: OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.04- 1.71). In conclusion, this meta-analysis provided evidence that the MAOB A644G polymorphism may contribute to PD development in Northern China. Further studies conducted in other ethnic groups are required for definite conclusions.

Although various individual studies have evaluated the correlation between monoamine oxidase B (MAOB), polymorphism, and Parkinson’s disease (PD), the results remain inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis in the Chinese population to provide comprehensive data on the association between the MAOB polymorphism and PD. Eligible studies were identified via databases such as PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biology Medicine, throughout November 2015. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strengths of these associations. Eight studies documenting a total of 1385 cases of PD and 1426 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was found between the MAOB A644G polymorphism and PD risk in the Chinese population. However, in subgroup analyses, where results were stratified by geographical areas and source of controls, increased risk for PD in Northern China was observed (allele A vs G: OR = 1.33, 95%CI = 1.11-1.58; AA vs GG: OR = 1.46, 95%CI = 1.09-1.97; AA + AG vs GG: OR = 1.42, 95%CI = 1.06-1.90). Similarly, population-based studies also showed significant association between the MAOB A644G polymorphism and PD risk among different populations (allele A vs G: OR = 1.29, 95%CI = 1.11-1.51; AA vs GG: OR = 1.41, 95%CI = 1.09-1.82; AA + AG vs GG: OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.04- 1.71). In conclusion, this meta-analysis provided evidence that the MAOB A644G polymorphism may contribute to PD development in Northern China. Further studies conducted in other ethnic groups are required for definite conclusions.