Research Article

Glutathione S-transferase P1 rs1695 A>G polymorphism and breast cancer risk: evidence from a meta-analysis

Published: June 16, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr7771 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15027771

Abstract

Breast cancer (BC) is the most widespread cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Many published studies have assessed the association between the glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) rs1695 polymorphism and BC risk. However, the effect of the GSTP1 rs1695 polymorphism on BC risk has remained controversial. Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted to obtain a comprehensive estimation of this association. A total of 20,615 cases and 20,481 controls from thirty-six case-control trials were extracted from an online literature survey. The meta-analysis indicated that the GSTP1 rs1695 A>G polymorphism did not contribute to the susceptibility of BC when the overall population was considered. However, intriguingly, this polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk of BC in Asian women [GG vs AA: odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.88, P = 0.02; AG vs AA: OR = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.00-1.16, P = 0.05; GG/AG vs AA: OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.04-1.19, P = 0.00]. Moreover, a subgroup analysis based on the source of control groups showed a marked increase in BC susceptibility in hospital-based control subjects (GG vs AA: OR = 1.28, 95%CI = 1.10-1.48, P= 0.00; GG vs AG/AA: OR = 1.22, 95%CI = 1.06-1.41, P = 0.00; GG/AG vs AA: OR = 1.10, 95%CI = 1.02-1.18, P = 0.00). In conclusion, our study indicated that the GSTP1 rs1695 A>G polymorphism was correlated with elevated BC risk in Asian women. Our results must be validated with further research.

Breast cancer (BC) is the most widespread cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Many published studies have assessed the association between the glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) rs1695 polymorphism and BC risk. However, the effect of the GSTP1 rs1695 polymorphism on BC risk has remained controversial. Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted to obtain a comprehensive estimation of this association. A total of 20,615 cases and 20,481 controls from thirty-six case-control trials were extracted from an online literature survey. The meta-analysis indicated that the GSTP1 rs1695 A>G polymorphism did not contribute to the susceptibility of BC when the overall population was considered. However, intriguingly, this polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk of BC in Asian women [GG vs AA: odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.88, P = 0.02; AG vs AA: OR = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.00-1.16, P = 0.05; GG/AG vs AA: OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.04-1.19, P = 0.00]. Moreover, a subgroup analysis based on the source of control groups showed a marked increase in BC susceptibility in hospital-based control subjects (GG vs AA: OR = 1.28, 95%CI = 1.10-1.48, P= 0.00; GG vs AG/AA: OR = 1.22, 95%CI = 1.06-1.41, P = 0.00; GG/AG vs AA: OR = 1.10, 95%CI = 1.02-1.18, P = 0.00). In conclusion, our study indicated that the GSTP1 rs1695 A>G polymorphism was correlated with elevated BC risk in Asian women. Our results must be validated with further research.