Research Article

Genetic potential of segregating populations of red beans conducted by the bulk method with selection

Published: June 10, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr7329 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15027329

Abstract

This study evaluated the performance and estimated the genetic potential of segregating populations of red bean. Twenty populations of the second cycle of recurrent selection for red bean breeding at Universidade Federal de Viçosa were advanced to the F5 generation in bulk with selection for grain appearance. Populations plus five controls were evaluated for grain yield in three dry seasons (2004, 2005, and 2007) in a 5 x 5 lattice design with three replications, in four 4-m long rows. In the mean of the three crops, populations formed three distinct groups in which some populations had a clearly superior grain yield. Populations 288RVCI, 291RVCI, 295RVCI, 297RVCI, 300RVCI, and 303RVCI were the most promising. Over generations, segregating populations by the bulk method with selection for grain appearance may have reduced variability in grain yield. The 300RVCI population deserves further attention as it combines variability, high mean, and a high probability of generating above-standard lines.

This study evaluated the performance and estimated the genetic potential of segregating populations of red bean. Twenty populations of the second cycle of recurrent selection for red bean breeding at Universidade Federal de Viçosa were advanced to the F5 generation in bulk with selection for grain appearance. Populations plus five controls were evaluated for grain yield in three dry seasons (2004, 2005, and 2007) in a 5 x 5 lattice design with three replications, in four 4-m long rows. In the mean of the three crops, populations formed three distinct groups in which some populations had a clearly superior grain yield. Populations 288RVCI, 291RVCI, 295RVCI, 297RVCI, 300RVCI, and 303RVCI were the most promising. Over generations, segregating populations by the bulk method with selection for grain appearance may have reduced variability in grain yield. The 300RVCI population deserves further attention as it combines variability, high mean, and a high probability of generating above-standard lines.