Research Article

Meta-analysis of the IL-10 promoter polymorphisms and pediatric asthma susceptibility

Published: June 03, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr8320 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15028320

Abstract

The results of previous epidemiological studies exploring the relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter polymorphisms and susceptibility to pediatric asthma are not consistent. Therefore, we have performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide a more convincing conclusion. Odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of association between the IL-10 promoter polymorphisms and susceptibility to pediatric asthma. Publication bias was examined by Begg’s funnel plots and the Egger test. A detailed literature search based on stringent parameters yielded sixteen relevant studies, comprising 2494 cases and 2160 controls. The overall population showed no significant association between the IL-10 -1082G/A polymorphism and pediatric asthma risk in any of the genetic models (dominant model: OR = 1.583, 95%CI = 0.614-4.076, P = 0.342; allelic model: OR = 1.214, 95%CI = 0.748-1.971, P = 0.433; additive model: OR = 2.240, 95%CI = 0.950-5.277, P = 0.065; recessive model: OR = 1.435, 95%CI = 0.659-3.128, P = 0.363). Subgroup analyses revealed a significant association between different ethnicity and atopic status subgroups. However, there was no evidence of a significant association between the other two polymorphisms (-819C/ T and -592C/A) and pediatric asthma in our study. No significant publication bias was observed in this meta-analysis. The results of this study indicate that the IL-10 -1082G/A polymorphism might be a risk factor for asthma in children. However, because of the small sample size included in the subgroup analyses, the results should be interpreted with caution.

The results of previous epidemiological studies exploring the relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter polymorphisms and susceptibility to pediatric asthma are not consistent. Therefore, we have performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide a more convincing conclusion. Odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of association between the IL-10 promoter polymorphisms and susceptibility to pediatric asthma. Publication bias was examined by Begg’s funnel plots and the Egger test. A detailed literature search based on stringent parameters yielded sixteen relevant studies, comprising 2494 cases and 2160 controls. The overall population showed no significant association between the IL-10 -1082G/A polymorphism and pediatric asthma risk in any of the genetic models (dominant model: OR = 1.583, 95%CI = 0.614-4.076, P = 0.342; allelic model: OR = 1.214, 95%CI = 0.748-1.971, P = 0.433; additive model: OR = 2.240, 95%CI = 0.950-5.277, P = 0.065; recessive model: OR = 1.435, 95%CI = 0.659-3.128, P = 0.363). Subgroup analyses revealed a significant association between different ethnicity and atopic status subgroups. However, there was no evidence of a significant association between the other two polymorphisms (-819C/ T and -592C/A) and pediatric asthma in our study. No significant publication bias was observed in this meta-analysis. The results of this study indicate that the IL-10 -1082G/A polymorphism might be a risk factor for asthma in children. However, because of the small sample size included in the subgroup analyses, the results should be interpreted with caution.

About the Authors