Research Article

Acyl sugars and whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) resistance in segregating populations of tomato genotypes

Published: April 07, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr7788 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15027788

Abstract

The wild tomato, Solanum pennellii, is an important source of resistance genes against tomato pests. This resistance is due to the presence of acyl sugars (AS), which are allelochemicals that have negative effects on arthropod pests. There are no commercially available tomato cultivars that exhibit significant levels of resistance to arthropod pests. Therefore, this study evaluated resistance to whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in F2 and F2RC1 tomato genotypes with high AS levels from a cross between Solanum lycopersicum ‘Redenção’ and the S. pennellii accession, LA-716. Plants were exposed to B. tabaci biotype B at the pre-flowering stage. In both generations, there were significant, negative correlations between AS content and oviposition preference and nymph development. Whitefly exhibited a lower preference for oviposition and produced fewer nymphs in genotypes with high AS levels and the wild parent S. pennellii than in the low AS-level genotypes and Redenção cultivar, demonstrating that the breeding program was effective in transferring resistance to the F2 and F2RC1 generations. RVTA-2010-pl#31 and RVTA-2010-pl#94 in the F2 population are promising genotypes that produced materials with high AS levels in the F2RC1 generation (RVTA-2010-31-pl#177 and RVTA-2010-94-pl#381).

The wild tomato, Solanum pennellii, is an important source of resistance genes against tomato pests. This resistance is due to the presence of acyl sugars (AS), which are allelochemicals that have negative effects on arthropod pests. There are no commercially available tomato cultivars that exhibit significant levels of resistance to arthropod pests. Therefore, this study evaluated resistance to whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in F2 and F2RC1 tomato genotypes with high AS levels from a cross between Solanum lycopersicum ‘Redenção’ and the S. pennellii accession, LA-716. Plants were exposed to B. tabaci biotype B at the pre-flowering stage. In both generations, there were significant, negative correlations between AS content and oviposition preference and nymph development. Whitefly exhibited a lower preference for oviposition and produced fewer nymphs in genotypes with high AS levels and the wild parent S. pennellii than in the low AS-level genotypes and Redenção cultivar, demonstrating that the breeding program was effective in transferring resistance to the F2 and F2RC1 generations. RVTA-2010-pl#31 and RVTA-2010-pl#94 in the F2 population are promising genotypes that produced materials with high AS levels in the F2RC1 generation (RVTA-2010-31-pl#177 and RVTA-2010-94-pl#381).