Research Article

Sequence analysis of the S1PR1 gene in river buffalo

Published: January 29, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(1): gmr6363 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15016363

Abstract

Recent developments in methodologies for genomic analyses have enabled a significant advance in understanding of the river buffalo genome. The S1PR1 gene has been mapped to buffalo chromosome 6 and bovine chromosome 3; this gene is of interest as it is a candidate for marbling in meat, an important economic trait. Here, we performed next generation sequencing in a buffalo BAC DNA clone and obtained a 54.5-kb sequence encompassing the entire buffalo S1PR1 gene as well as the 27 kb upstream region and the 22 kb downstream region. The gene had a total length of 4716 bp, including three exons and two introns; exons 1 and 2 were classified as non-protein-coding. In comparison with homologues from other species, the structural organization of buffalo S1PR1 was closest to that of the goat and in both species exon 2 of the gene was non-protein-coding. One hundred and nine repetitive elements were found within the buffalo gene and its boundary regions, with 50 SINE repeats being the most abundant. Alignment of S1PR1 sequences from the Murrah and Mediterranean breeds revealed two nucleotide substitutions (g.1176C>G and g.2740T>C), which represent potential SNPs that could be used in further studies of buffalo genetic structure.

Recent developments in methodologies for genomic analyses have enabled a significant advance in understanding of the river buffalo genome. The S1PR1 gene has been mapped to buffalo chromosome 6 and bovine chromosome 3; this gene is of interest as it is a candidate for marbling in meat, an important economic trait. Here, we performed next generation sequencing in a buffalo BAC DNA clone and obtained a 54.5-kb sequence encompassing the entire buffalo S1PR1 gene as well as the 27 kb upstream region and the 22 kb downstream region. The gene had a total length of 4716 bp, including three exons and two introns; exons 1 and 2 were classified as non-protein-coding. In comparison with homologues from other species, the structural organization of buffalo S1PR1 was closest to that of the goat and in both species exon 2 of the gene was non-protein-coding. One hundred and nine repetitive elements were found within the buffalo gene and its boundary regions, with 50 SINE repeats being the most abundant. Alignment of S1PR1 sequences from the Murrah and Mediterranean breeds revealed two nucleotide substitutions (g.1176C>G and g.2740T>C), which represent potential SNPs that could be used in further studies of buffalo genetic structure.