Research Article

Development of polymorphic SSR markers in the razor clam (Sinonovacula constricta) and cross-species amplification

Published: January 26, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(1): gmr7285 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15017285

Abstract

Next-generation sequencing provides large-scale sequencing data with relative ease and at a reasonable cost, making it possible to identify a large amount of SSR markers in a timely and cost-effective manner. On the basis of the transcriptome database of Sinonovacula constricta obtained by Illumina/Solexa pyrosequencing, 60 polymorphic SSR markers were developed and characterized in 30 individuals. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 3.75 alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.050 to 1.000 and from 0.050 to 0.836, respectively. Nineteen loci significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P Solen linearis were first characterized in this study. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest number of SSRs in S. constricta and the first report of cross-species amplification. These novel polymorphic SSR markers will be particularly useful for conservation genetics, evolutionary studies, genetic trait mapping, and marker assisted selection in the species.

Next-generation sequencing provides large-scale sequencing data with relative ease and at a reasonable cost, making it possible to identify a large amount of SSR markers in a timely and cost-effective manner. On the basis of the transcriptome database of Sinonovacula constricta obtained by Illumina/Solexa pyrosequencing, 60 polymorphic SSR markers were developed and characterized in 30 individuals. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 3.75 alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.050 to 1.000 and from 0.050 to 0.836, respectively. Nineteen loci significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P Solen linearis were first characterized in this study. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest number of SSRs in S. constricta and the first report of cross-species amplification. These novel polymorphic SSR markers will be particularly useful for conservation genetics, evolutionary studies, genetic trait mapping, and marker assisted selection in the species.