Research Article

Interaction of the CYP1A1 gene polymorphism and smoking in non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility

Published: January 04, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 14(4): gmr6152 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.30.2

Abstract

Many studies have shown that genetic factors, environmental factors, and bad living habits, especially smoking, are risk factors for lung cancer. However, not all smokers develop lung cancer, which may be related to different genetic backgrounds. Currently, most research has investigated the GSTM1, XRCC1, XRCC3, CYP2D6, and C188T genes. Little research has been done on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 gene, and results have varied. In addition, no results have been reported on the interactive effects of smoking and the CYP1A1 gene on lung cancer development. We used polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism to detect the CYP1A1 genotype, and investigate the effects of the CYP1A1 gene deletion and smoking alone, and in combination, on non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility. We enrolled 150 non-small cell lung cancer patients and 150 healthy control subjects. Subjects’ smoking habits and CYP1A1 gene polymorphism were analyzed to investigate their role in the occurrence of lung cancer. The CYP1A1 gene deletion was found in 73.3% of non-small cell lung cancer patients and 20.0% of healthy subjects. The OR value was 2.28 (P CYP1A1 gene deletion was 5.60, larger than the product of their individual OR values. The CYP1A1 gene deletion is a lung cancer risk factor, and interacts with smoking in non-small cell lung cancer development.

Many studies have shown that genetic factors, environmental factors, and bad living habits, especially smoking, are risk factors for lung cancer. However, not all smokers develop lung cancer, which may be related to different genetic backgrounds. Currently, most research has investigated the GSTM1, XRCC1, XRCC3, CYP2D6, and C188T genes. Little research has been done on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 gene, and results have varied. In addition, no results have been reported on the interactive effects of smoking and the CYP1A1 gene on lung cancer development. We used polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism to detect the CYP1A1 genotype, and investigate the effects of the CYP1A1 gene deletion and smoking alone, and in combination, on non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility. We enrolled 150 non-small cell lung cancer patients and 150 healthy control subjects. Subjects’ smoking habits and CYP1A1 gene polymorphism were analyzed to investigate their role in the occurrence of lung cancer. The CYP1A1 gene deletion was found in 73.3% of non-small cell lung cancer patients and 20.0% of healthy subjects. The OR value was 2.28 (P < 0.05). Among smoking subjects, 77.8% exhibited non-small cell lung cancer, significantly higher than the 27.3% in non-smokers (P < 0.05). The OR value for the interaction of smoking and CYP1A1 gene deletion was 5.60, larger than the product of their individual OR values. The CYP1A1 gene deletion is a lung cancer risk factor, and interacts with smoking in non-small cell lung cancer development.

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