Research Article

Association of TNF-α, CTLA4, and PTPN22 polymorphisms with type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases in Brazil

Published: December 28, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 18936-18944 DOI: 10.4238/2015.December.28.42

Abstract

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is a complex disorder characterized by an autoimmune response against human pancreatic beta-cells. Patients with T1D can also develop a response toward one or more other factors, such as in autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD) and celiac disease (CD). In the presence of T1D + AITD, the patient is diagnosed with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III (APSIII); patients with APSIII may also present with CD. These diseases have a strong genetic component and share many susceptibility genes, suggesting potentially overlapping pathogenic pathways. Polymorphisms in the TNF-α(rs1800629), CTLA-4 (rs231775), and PTPN22 (rs2476601) genes have been previous associated with T1D; however, there is no consensus regarding their role in T1D and scarce literature focusing on AIDT and/or CD. Thus, we analyzed these genetic variants in 205 Northeast Brazilian patients with T1D and with/without AITD and/or CD, and in 308 healthy controls. The PTPN22 gene variants were associated with T1D susceptibility and APSIII [odds ratio (OR) = 2.57 and 2.77, respectively]. CTLA4 rs231775 and TNF-αrs1800629 were not associated with T1D onset in the Brazilian population. However, when comparing APSIII individuals in the T1D only group, we observed an association of the TNF-αSNP in the allelic (P = 0.0442; OR = 0.44) and dominant models (P = 0.0387; OR = 0.40). This study reinforces the importance of CTLA-4 and other variants in unraveling the pathogenic mechanisms of T1D in different populations and in understanding their relationships with the development of other T1D-related autoimmune diseases.

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is a complex disorder characterized by an autoimmune response against human pancreatic beta-cells. Patients with T1D can also develop a response toward one or more other factors, such as in autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD) and celiac disease (CD). In the presence of T1D + AITD, the patient is diagnosed with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III (APSIII); patients with APSIII may also present with CD. These diseases have a strong genetic component and share many susceptibility genes, suggesting potentially overlapping pathogenic pathways. Polymorphisms in the TNF-α(rs1800629), CTLA-4 (rs231775), and PTPN22 (rs2476601) genes have been previous associated with T1D; however, there is no consensus regarding their role in T1D and scarce literature focusing on AIDT and/or CD. Thus, we analyzed these genetic variants in 205 Northeast Brazilian patients with T1D and with/without AITD and/or CD, and in 308 healthy controls. The PTPN22 gene variants were associated with T1D susceptibility and APSIII [odds ratio (OR) = 2.57 and 2.77, respectively]. CTLA4 rs231775 and TNF-αrs1800629 were not associated with T1D onset in the Brazilian population. However, when comparing APSIII individuals in the T1D only group, we observed an association of the TNF-αSNP in the allelic (P = 0.0442; OR = 0.44) and dominant models (P = 0.0387; OR = 0.40). This study reinforces the importance of CTLA-4 and other variants in unraveling the pathogenic mechanisms of T1D in different populations and in understanding their relationships with the development of other T1D-related autoimmune diseases.