Research Article

Diagnostic performance of microRNA-29a for colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

Published: December 22, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 18018-18025 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.22.28

Abstract

Previous studies have revealed that the expression level of microRNA-29a (miR-29a) was remarkably different in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and healthy controls, indicating that miR-29a can be used as a diagnostic marker of CRC, but the results have been inconsistent. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic performance of blood-based miR-29a for CRC. We performed a systematic review of studies published over the past two decades to investigate the diagnostic performance of serum miR-29a for the diagnosis of CRC. QUADAS-2 was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. Performance characteristics (diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy) were pooled and examined using random-effect models. Five studies, which included 281 CRC patients and 299 healthy controls, met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for miR-29a in CRC diagnoses showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 0.59 (95%CI = 0.53-0.65), a specificity of 0.89 (95%CI = 0.85-0.93), and a diagnostic odds ratio of 12.22 (95%CI = 5.07-29.44). The area under curve and Q value for the summary receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.9128 and 0.8453, respectively. In conclusion, miR-29a may be a novel potential biomarker for CRC diagnosis.

Previous studies have revealed that the expression level of microRNA-29a (miR-29a) was remarkably different in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and healthy controls, indicating that miR-29a can be used as a diagnostic marker of CRC, but the results have been inconsistent. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic performance of blood-based miR-29a for CRC. We performed a systematic review of studies published over the past two decades to investigate the diagnostic performance of serum miR-29a for the diagnosis of CRC. QUADAS-2 was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. Performance characteristics (diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy) were pooled and examined using random-effect models. Five studies, which included 281 CRC patients and 299 healthy controls, met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for miR-29a in CRC diagnoses showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 0.59 (95%CI = 0.53-0.65), a specificity of 0.89 (95%CI = 0.85-0.93), and a diagnostic odds ratio of 12.22 (95%CI = 5.07-29.44). The area under curve and Q value for the summary receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.9128 and 0.8453, respectively. In conclusion, miR-29a may be a novel potential biomarker for CRC diagnosis.