Research Article

Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism (insertion/deletion) and liver fibrosis in Turkish patients from the western Black Sea region, Turkey

Published: December 16, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 17079-17090 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.16.8
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Abstract

Chronic viral hepatitis B, chronic viral hepatitis C, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and secondary biliary cirrhosis are important health issues worldwide. While an association between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion (ACE gene I/D) polymorphism and liver fibrosis has been demonstrated in rat studies, the results of clinical studies area have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and liver fibrosis in a large group of Turkish patients from the western Black Sea region. In 418 patients with different etiologies, ACE gene I/D polymorphism and serum ACE levels were investigated. The distribution of the “DD”, “ID”, “II” genotypes of the ACE gene were 32.5, 48.8, and 18.7% in the mild to moderate fibrosis group (N = 246, F:1-3 according to Ishak’s score) and 39.0, 44.2, and 16.9% in the advanced fibrosis group (N = 172, F:4-6 according to Ishak’s score). A significant correlation between serum ACE levels and ACE gene alleles was identified (P

Chronic viral hepatitis B, chronic viral hepatitis C, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and secondary biliary cirrhosis are important health issues worldwide. While an association between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion (ACE gene I/D) polymorphism and liver fibrosis has been demonstrated in rat studies, the results of clinical studies area have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and liver fibrosis in a large group of Turkish patients from the western Black Sea region. In 418 patients with different etiologies, ACE gene I/D polymorphism and serum ACE levels were investigated. The distribution of the “DD”, “ID”, “II” genotypes of the ACE gene were 32.5, 48.8, and 18.7% in the mild to moderate fibrosis group (N = 246, F:1-3 according to Ishak’s score) and 39.0, 44.2, and 16.9% in the advanced fibrosis group (N = 172, F:4-6 according to Ishak’s score). A significant correlation between serum ACE levels and ACE gene alleles was identified (P < 0.001): serum ACE levels of patients with D alleles were higher than those of patients with I alleles [44 (min 7-max 101) versus 29 (min 7-max 96)]. Patients with advanced fibrosis were also found to be older than those with mild to moderate fibrosis (P < 0.001). No significant association was noted between the patient gender and fibrosis severity. We conclude that ACE I/D polymorphism is not associated with the degree of liver fibrosis.