Research Article

Association of the interleukin-6 gene -572G/C polymorphism with cancer risk: a meta-analysis

Published: December 14, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 16921-16928 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.14.20
Cite this Article:
(2015). Association of the interleukin-6 gene -572G/C polymorphism with cancer risk: a meta-analysis. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(4): gmr6879. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.14.20
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Abstract

The -572G/C polymorphism in interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene is associated with the development of cancer. However, previous studies have shown conflicting results; therefore, the association must be verified by an appropriate meta-analysis. For this purpose, we performed a literature search of the PubMed database to identify all reports on association between the IL-6 -572G/C polymorphism and cancer risk. Summary odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated for the -572G/C polymorphism and cancer in a fixed- and random-effect model, as appropriate. Publication bias was evaluated using the Begg’s funnel plot. The meta-analysis was performed on the STATA (v.12.0) software. Seven studies, which analyzed 3387 cases and 4529 controls, were identified. The results of the meta-analysis showed no significant association between the -572G/C polymorphism in the IL-6 gene and cancer risk (GG vs CC: OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 0.76-1.40; GG vs CG: OR = 0.94, 95%CI = 0.82-1.09; dominant model: OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.92-1.21; recessive model: OR = 1.01, 95%CI = 0.86-1.18). The data were subjected to a subgroup analysis (stratified by race and cancer type), and no significant associations were found between the -572G/C polymorphism in the IL-6 gene and cancer risk. Therefore, the results of this meta-analysis suggested that the IL-6 -572G/C polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of cancer.

The -572G/C polymorphism in interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene is associated with the development of cancer. However, previous studies have shown conflicting results; therefore, the association must be verified by an appropriate meta-analysis. For this purpose, we performed a literature search of the PubMed database to identify all reports on association between the IL-6 -572G/C polymorphism and cancer risk. Summary odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated for the -572G/C polymorphism and cancer in a fixed- and random-effect model, as appropriate. Publication bias was evaluated using the Begg’s funnel plot. The meta-analysis was performed on the STATA (v.12.0) software. Seven studies, which analyzed 3387 cases and 4529 controls, were identified. The results of the meta-analysis showed no significant association between the -572G/C polymorphism in the IL-6 gene and cancer risk (GG vs CC: OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 0.76-1.40; GG vs CG: OR = 0.94, 95%CI = 0.82-1.09; dominant model: OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.92-1.21; recessive model: OR = 1.01, 95%CI = 0.86-1.18). The data were subjected to a subgroup analysis (stratified by race and cancer type), and no significant associations were found between the -572G/C polymorphism in the IL-6 gene and cancer risk. Therefore, the results of this meta-analysis suggested that the IL-6 -572G/C polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of cancer.