Research Article

Correlation between magnetic resonance perfusion weighted imaging of radiation brain injury and pathology

Published: December 08, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 16317-16324 DOI: 10.4238/2015.December.8.23

Abstract

We used magnetic resonance perfusion weighted imaging and pathological evaluation to examine different stages of radiation-induced brain injury and to investigate the correlation between the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) ratio and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thirty adult rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and radiation group. The control group was not subjected to irradiation. The irradiation group rats were examined by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance perfusion weighted imaging at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after radiation treatment. We measured the rCBV, mean transit time, and time to peak. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, and electron microscopy were performed. VEGF absorbance was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Compared with the control group, the differences in rCBV, mean transit time, time to peak, and VEGF absorbance after 3 months were statistically significant (P < 0.05). rCBV was positively correlated with VEGF (r = 0.94, P < 0.05). Magnetic resonance perfusion weighted imaging can reflect pathophysiological changes in brain tissue after irradiation. Decreased expression of VEGF plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury.

We used magnetic resonance perfusion weighted imaging and pathological evaluation to examine different stages of radiation-induced brain injury and to investigate the correlation between the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) ratio and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thirty adult rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and radiation group. The control group was not subjected to irradiation. The irradiation group rats were examined by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance perfusion weighted imaging at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after radiation treatment. We measured the rCBV, mean transit time, and time to peak. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, and electron microscopy were performed. VEGF absorbance was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Compared with the control group, the differences in rCBV, mean transit time, time to peak, and VEGF absorbance after 3 months were statistically significant (P < 0.05). rCBV was positively correlated with VEGF (r = 0.94, P < 0.05). Magnetic resonance perfusion weighted imaging can reflect pathophysiological changes in brain tissue after irradiation. Decreased expression of VEGF plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury.