Research Article

Inhibition of andrographolide in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage osteoclastogenesis by downregulating the nuclear factor-kappaB signaling pathway

Published: December 07, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 15955-15961 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.7.7
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Abstract

This study aims to investigate the effects of andrographolide (AGP) on osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. The effects of AGP on cell viability were determined in RAW 264.7 cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of AGP on osteoclast formation were tested by osteoclast staining with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). The effects of AGP on receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) ligand (RANKL)-induced, NF-kappaB-dependent transcription in RAW 264.7 cells were assessed using luciferase reporter assays. The results demonstrated that the viability of osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cells was not affected by AGP treatment at a concentration of 0.4 to 10 μM. Additionally, the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts was significantly reduced by the same concentrations of AGP treatment. AGP also inhibited RANKL-induced NF-kappaB activation in a dose-dependent fashion as evidenced by luciferase reporter assays. In summary, this study demonstrates that AGP inhibits osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells through downregulation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

This study aims to investigate the effects of andrographolide (AGP) on osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. The effects of AGP on cell viability were determined in RAW 264.7 cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of AGP on osteoclast formation were tested by osteoclast staining with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). The effects of AGP on receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) ligand (RANKL)-induced, NF-kappaB-dependent transcription in RAW 264.7 cells were assessed using luciferase reporter assays. The results demonstrated that the viability of osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cells was not affected by AGP treatment at a concentration of 0.4 to 10 μM. Additionally, the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts was significantly reduced by the same concentrations of AGP treatment. AGP also inhibited RANKL-induced NF-kappaB activation in a dose-dependent fashion as evidenced by luciferase reporter assays. In summary, this study demonstrates that AGP inhibits osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells through downregulation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

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