Research Article

Effectiveness of muscle basal lamina carrying neural stem cells and olfactory ensheathing cells in spinal cord repair

Published: October 28, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 13437-13455 DOI: 10.4238/2015.October.28.5

Abstract

We examined the effect of muscle basal lamina (MBL) with neural stem cells (NSCs) and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) on spinal cord injury repair. Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to spinal cord hemisection and divided into 6 groups. In blank control group (group A), the ends of the spinal cord hemisection model were flushed with physiological saline. In NSC transplantation group (B), OEC transplantation group (C), MBL with NSC transplantation group (D), MBL with OEC transplantation group (E), and MBL with NSC and OEC transplantation group (F), NSCs, OECs, MBL with NSCs, MBL with OECs, and MBL with NSCs and OECs were implanted into the ends of the hemisection model. Survival and migration of transplanted cells were detected by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence after 4 and 8 weeks. Hind limb function repair was evaluated by Bundle branch block score at various time points before and after surgery. MBL could promote NSC growth along its lumen and promote host cell advancement in the lumen, reducing local inflammatory responses. Using MBL with NSCs and/or OECs for spinal cord repair shows advantages over simple cell transplantation. Group F contained more nerve cells in muscle basal lamina than group E. This method is useful for forming more axons, synaptic connections, and signal transduction pathways. However, these new axons showed nerve demyelination, which may greatly limit nerve signal conduction. In group F, OECs could induce neural stem cells, axonal growth, and synaptic connection formation, but its role is limited.

We examined the effect of muscle basal lamina (MBL) with neural stem cells (NSCs) and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) on spinal cord injury repair. Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to spinal cord hemisection and divided into 6 groups. In blank control group (group A), the ends of the spinal cord hemisection model were flushed with physiological saline. In NSC transplantation group (B), OEC transplantation group (C), MBL with NSC transplantation group (D), MBL with OEC transplantation group (E), and MBL with NSC and OEC transplantation group (F), NSCs, OECs, MBL with NSCs, MBL with OECs, and MBL with NSCs and OECs were implanted into the ends of the hemisection model. Survival and migration of transplanted cells were detected by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence after 4 and 8 weeks. Hind limb function repair was evaluated by Bundle branch block score at various time points before and after surgery. MBL could promote NSC growth along its lumen and promote host cell advancement in the lumen, reducing local inflammatory responses. Using MBL with NSCs and/or OECs for spinal cord repair shows advantages over simple cell transplantation. Group F contained more nerve cells in muscle basal lamina than group E. This method is useful for forming more axons, synaptic connections, and signal transduction pathways. However, these new axons showed nerve demyelination, which may greatly limit nerve signal conduction. In group F, OECs could induce neural stem cells, axonal growth, and synaptic connection formation, but its role is limited.

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