Research Article

Expression of the 2-dehydro-3-deoxyphosphooc­tonate aldolase (KdsA) gene in mulberry leaves (Morus alba L.) is down-regulated under high salt and drought stress

Published: October 05, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 11955-11964 DOI: 10.4238/2015.October.5.9

Abstract

The oligosaccharide 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) is a key component of lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria, and is also part of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan (RG-II) of the plant cell wall. The enzyme KDO-8-phosphate synthase (KDO8Ps), encoded by the 2-dehydro-3-deoxyphosphooctonate aldolase (KdsA) gene, catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of Kdo. In this study, the complete coding sequence of the KdsA gene from mulberry leaves was cloned and the primary structure of KDO8Ps was deduced. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of KDO8Ps from mulberry with those of five other plant species revealed a high level of evolutionary conservation. A phylogenetic tree analysis demonstrated a short genetic distance among KDO8Ps proteins of different species. Expression of the KdsA gene was higher in the second leaves than in the eighth leaves of mulberry, and was down-regulated under conditions of high salt or drought stress. Our results suggest that KdsA expression is important for the growth of new plant tissues, and is sensitive to harsh environments.

The oligosaccharide 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) is a key component of lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria, and is also part of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan (RG-II) of the plant cell wall. The enzyme KDO-8-phosphate synthase (KDO8Ps), encoded by the 2-dehydro-3-deoxyphosphooctonate aldolase (KdsA) gene, catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of Kdo. In this study, the complete coding sequence of the KdsA gene from mulberry leaves was cloned and the primary structure of KDO8Ps was deduced. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of KDO8Ps from mulberry with those of five other plant species revealed a high level of evolutionary conservation. A phylogenetic tree analysis demonstrated a short genetic distance among KDO8Ps proteins of different species. Expression of the KdsA gene was higher in the second leaves than in the eighth leaves of mulberry, and was down-regulated under conditions of high salt or drought stress. Our results suggest that KdsA expression is important for the growth of new plant tissues, and is sensitive to harsh environments.