Research Article

Evaluation of microsatellite loci from libraries derived from the wild diploid 'Calcutta 4' and 'Ouro' banana cultivars

Published: September 25, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 11410-11428 DOI: 10.4238/2015.September.25.9

Abstract

Microsatellite markers have been widely used in the quantification of genetic variability and for genetic breeding in Musa spp. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the discriminatory power of microsatellite markers derived from ‘Calcutta 4’ and ‘Ouro’ genomic libraries, and to analyze the genetic variability among 30 banana accessions. Thirty-eight markers were used: 15 from the ‘Ouro’ library and 23 from the ‘Calcutta 4’ library. Genetic diversity was evaluated by considering SSR markers as both dominant markers because of the presence of triploid accessions, and co-dominant markers. For the dominant analysis, polymorphism information content (PIC) values for 44 polymorphic markers ranged from 0.063 to 0.533, with a mean value of 0.24. A dendrogram analysis separated the BGB-Banana accessions into 4 groups: the ‘Ouro’ and ‘Muísa Tia’ accessions were the most dissimilar (93% dissimilarity), while the most similar accessions were ‘Pacovan’ and ‘Walha’. The mean genetic distance between samples was 0.74. For the analysis considering SSR markers as co-dominants, using only diploid accessions, two groups were separated based on their genome contents (A and B). The PIC values for the markers from the ‘Calcutta 4’ library varied from 0.4836 to 0.7886, whereas those from the ‘Ouro’ library ranged from 0.3800 to 0.7521. Given the high PIC values, the markers from both the libraries showed high discriminatory power, and can therefore be widely applied for analysis of genetic diversity, population structures, and linkage mapping in Musa spp.

Microsatellite markers have been widely used in the quantification of genetic variability and for genetic breeding in Musa spp. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the discriminatory power of microsatellite markers derived from ‘Calcutta 4’ and ‘Ouro’ genomic libraries, and to analyze the genetic variability among 30 banana accessions. Thirty-eight markers were used: 15 from the ‘Ouro’ library and 23 from the ‘Calcutta 4’ library. Genetic diversity was evaluated by considering SSR markers as both dominant markers because of the presence of triploid accessions, and co-dominant markers. For the dominant analysis, polymorphism information content (PIC) values for 44 polymorphic markers ranged from 0.063 to 0.533, with a mean value of 0.24. A dendrogram analysis separated the BGB-Banana accessions into 4 groups: the ‘Ouro’ and ‘Muísa Tia’ accessions were the most dissimilar (93% dissimilarity), while the most similar accessions were ‘Pacovan’ and ‘Walha’. The mean genetic distance between samples was 0.74. For the analysis considering SSR markers as co-dominants, using only diploid accessions, two groups were separated based on their genome contents (A and B). The PIC values for the markers from the ‘Calcutta 4’ library varied from 0.4836 to 0.7886, whereas those from the ‘Ouro’ library ranged from 0.3800 to 0.7521. Given the high PIC values, the markers from both the libraries showed high discriminatory power, and can therefore be widely applied for analysis of genetic diversity, population structures, and linkage mapping in Musa spp.