Research Article

Han Chinese patients with dopa-responsive dystonia exhibit a low frequency of exonic deletion in the GCH1 gene

Published: September 22, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 11185-11190 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.September.22.12
Cite this Article:
(2015). Han Chinese patients with dopa-responsive dystonia exhibit a low frequency of exonic deletion in the GCH1 gene. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(3): gmr6093. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.September.22.12
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Abstract

We identified three novel mutations of the GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) gene in patients with familial dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD), but were unable to identify meaningful sporadic mutations in patients with no obvious family DRD background. To investigate whether GCH1 regional deletions account for the etiology of DRD, we screened for heterozygous exonic deletions in DRD families and in patients with sporadic DRD. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed in all members of our DRD cohort and in controls to detect exonic deletions in GCH1, tyrosine hydroxylase, and the epsilon-sarcoglycan-encoding (SGCE) genes. Using these techniques, we detected a GCH1 exon 1 heterozygous deletion in 1 of 10 patients with sporadic DRD. Therefore, we concluded that exonic deletion in the GCH1 gene only accounted for the etiology in a small percentage of patients with sporadic DRD in our Han Chinese cohort.

We identified three novel mutations of the GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) gene in patients with familial dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD), but were unable to identify meaningful sporadic mutations in patients with no obvious family DRD background. To investigate whether GCH1 regional deletions account for the etiology of DRD, we screened for heterozygous exonic deletions in DRD families and in patients with sporadic DRD. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed in all members of our DRD cohort and in controls to detect exonic deletions in GCH1, tyrosine hydroxylase, and the epsilon-sarcoglycan-encoding (SGCE) genes. Using these techniques, we detected a GCH1 exon 1 heterozygous deletion in 1 of 10 patients with sporadic DRD. Therefore, we concluded that exonic deletion in the GCH1 gene only accounted for the etiology in a small percentage of patients with sporadic DRD in our Han Chinese cohort.