Research Article

Evidence of genetic tolerance to low availability of phosphorus in the soil among genotypes of Coffea canephora

Published: September 08, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 10576-10587 DOI: 10.4238/2015.September.8.19

Abstract

The expansion of agriculture to new areas in order to increase the competitiveness of coffee producing countries has resulted in cultivation expanding into regions with lower natural fertility. This scenario has created the need to differentiate genotypes of Conilon coffee based on their tolerance to low levels of nutrients in the soil, especially phosphorus, which imposes high limitations on crop yield in tropical regions. In this context, the objective of this study was to identify differential tolerance among genotypes of Conilon coffee cultivated in environments with different levels of phosphorus availability in the soil. The experiment was conducted in a controlled environment, following a completely randomized design, with three replications in a factorial scheme 13 x 3, the factors were as follows: 13 genotypes of Conilon coffee from groups of different ripening cycles and three environments with different levels of phosphorus availability in the soil (fertilization without phosphorus supply, and phosphorus supply at 50 and 100% of recommendations). Discrimination of tolerance was based on 14 variables, including vegetative growth, accumulation of dry matter, nutrient content, and nutritional efficiencies. Estimates of genetic parameters indicated high genotypic variability for genotypes cultivated in environments with low phosphorus availability in the soil. It was possible to classify genotypes 22, 23, 24, 67, 76, 77, and 83 as tolerant of a low availability of phosphorus in the soil during early development. There was no clear relationship between ripening cycles and the tolerance of the genotypes to low phosphorus availability in the soil.

The expansion of agriculture to new areas in order to increase the competitiveness of coffee producing countries has resulted in cultivation expanding into regions with lower natural fertility. This scenario has created the need to differentiate genotypes of Conilon coffee based on their tolerance to low levels of nutrients in the soil, especially phosphorus, which imposes high limitations on crop yield in tropical regions. In this context, the objective of this study was to identify differential tolerance among genotypes of Conilon coffee cultivated in environments with different levels of phosphorus availability in the soil. The experiment was conducted in a controlled environment, following a completely randomized design, with three replications in a factorial scheme 13 x 3, the factors were as follows: 13 genotypes of Conilon coffee from groups of different ripening cycles and three environments with different levels of phosphorus availability in the soil (fertilization without phosphorus supply, and phosphorus supply at 50 and 100% of recommendations). Discrimination of tolerance was based on 14 variables, including vegetative growth, accumulation of dry matter, nutrient content, and nutritional efficiencies. Estimates of genetic parameters indicated high genotypic variability for genotypes cultivated in environments with low phosphorus availability in the soil. It was possible to classify genotypes 22, 23, 24, 67, 76, 77, and 83 as tolerant of a low availability of phosphorus in the soil during early development. There was no clear relationship between ripening cycles and the tolerance of the genotypes to low phosphorus availability in the soil.