Research Article

Interactome analysis and design of inhibitors against selected protein targets of Ser/Thr protein kinase (STPK) signaling pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

Published: September 01, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 10390-10403 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.September.1.6
Cite this Article:
(2015). Interactome analysis and design of inhibitors against selected protein targets of Ser/Thr protein kinase (STPK) signaling pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(3): gmr6522. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.September.1.6
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Abstract

Tuberculosis continues to be a major cause of mortality worldwide despite significant advances in chemotherapy and development of the BCG vaccine. Although curable, the tuberculosis treatment period (6-9 months) presents many concerns, including patient noncompliance and the development of drug toxicity and drug resistance. This study aimed to understand the protein-protein interactions of key proteins involved in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis STPK signal transduction pathway (such as PknB, PknE, and PstP); in addition, we attempted to identify promising leads for the inhibition of protein-protein interactions. Interactome analyses revealed the interactions of these protein targets with several other proteins, including PknG and PbpA. Drug-like candidates were screened based on Lipinski’s rule of five and the absorption digestion metabolism excretion toxicity. Molecular docking of the target proteins with the selected ligands identified cryptolepine HCl to be a common molecule interacting with all protein targets (with a good docking score). The generation of a pharmacophore model for cryptolepine HCl revealed three pharmacophoric regions: aromatic hydrocarbon, hydrogen bond acceptor, and hydrogen bond donor, which play important roles in its interaction with the protein targets. Therefore, cryptolepine HCl appears to be a promising drug candidate for further optimization and validation against M. tuberculosis.

Tuberculosis continues to be a major cause of mortality worldwide despite significant advances in chemotherapy and development of the BCG vaccine. Although curable, the tuberculosis treatment period (6-9 months) presents many concerns, including patient noncompliance and the development of drug toxicity and drug resistance. This study aimed to understand the protein-protein interactions of key proteins involved in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis STPK signal transduction pathway (such as PknB, PknE, and PstP); in addition, we attempted to identify promising leads for the inhibition of protein-protein interactions. Interactome analyses revealed the interactions of these protein targets with several other proteins, including PknG and PbpA. Drug-like candidates were screened based on Lipinski’s rule of five and the absorption digestion metabolism excretion toxicity. Molecular docking of the target proteins with the selected ligands identified cryptolepine HCl to be a common molecule interacting with all protein targets (with a good docking score). The generation of a pharmacophore model for cryptolepine HCl revealed three pharmacophoric regions: aromatic hydrocarbon, hydrogen bond acceptor, and hydrogen bond donor, which play important roles in its interaction with the protein targets. Therefore, cryptolepine HCl appears to be a promising drug candidate for further optimization and validation against M. tuberculosis.