Research Article

Treatment and mechanism of BMMSCs on deep II degree scald of hamster skin

Published: July 27, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 8244-8251 DOI: 10.4238/2015.July.27.12

Abstract

In this study, we examined the treatment and mechanism of BMMSC on a deep II degree scald of the hamster skin. A deep II degree scald model on the skin of 40 hamsters was duplicated and divided randomly into a stem cell plantation group (group A) and model control group (group B). Skin cells were cultured in vitro until the allogeneic BMMSCs of the 5th generation formed with a cell count of 1 x 107/mL. Local injection plus liquid supernatant smearing was used to plant the cells into the position of the scald in the stem cell plantation group. The control group was given an equivalent amount of normal saline to observe the healing action, and 5 samples were taken in each group after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days for hematoxylin and eosin staining for physiological observation. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the amount of chymotrypsin in mast cells. The speed of healing in the stem cell transplantation group was greater than that in the control group; staining results showed that the quality of healing in the transplantation group was better than that in the control group. Chymotrypsin expression was detected in both groups, reaching a peak on day 3. BMMSCs can accelerate wound healing, and chymotrypsin in mast cells may participate in the wound healing process.

In this study, we examined the treatment and mechanism of BMMSC on a deep II degree scald of the hamster skin. A deep II degree scald model on the skin of 40 hamsters was duplicated and divided randomly into a stem cell plantation group (group A) and model control group (group B). Skin cells were cultured in vitro until the allogeneic BMMSCs of the 5th generation formed with a cell count of 1 x 107/mL. Local injection plus liquid supernatant smearing was used to plant the cells into the position of the scald in the stem cell plantation group. The control group was given an equivalent amount of normal saline to observe the healing action, and 5 samples were taken in each group after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days for hematoxylin and eosin staining for physiological observation. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the amount of chymotrypsin in mast cells. The speed of healing in the stem cell transplantation group was greater than that in the control group; staining results showed that the quality of healing in the transplantation group was better than that in the control group. Chymotrypsin expression was detected in both groups, reaching a peak on day 3. BMMSCs can accelerate wound healing, and chymotrypsin in mast cells may participate in the wound healing process.

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