Research Article

Rapid development of polymorphic microsatellite markers for the Amur sturgeon (Acipenser schrenckii) using next-generation sequencing technology

Published: July 14, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 7910-7913 DOI: 10.4238/2015.July.14.16

Abstract

Anthropogenic activities have seriously impacted wild resources of the Amur sturgeon, Acipenser schrenckii, and more infor­mation on local and regional population genetic structure is required to aid the conservation of this species. In this study, we report the develop­ment of 12 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing technology, and the genotyping of 24 individuals collected from a sturgeon farm. The results show that the mean number of ob­served alleles per locus is 6.6 (ranging from 2 to 17). Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0 to 0.958 and from 0.508 to 0.940, respectively. Not a single locus showed significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no linkage disequilibrium was observed among any pairwise loci. These highly informative microsat­ellite markers will be useful for genetic diversity and population struc­ture analyses of A. schrenckii and other species of this genus.

Anthropogenic activities have seriously impacted wild resources of the Amur sturgeon, Acipenser schrenckii, and more infor­mation on local and regional population genetic structure is required to aid the conservation of this species. In this study, we report the develop­ment of 12 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing technology, and the genotyping of 24 individuals collected from a sturgeon farm. The results show that the mean number of ob­served alleles per locus is 6.6 (ranging from 2 to 17). Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0 to 0.958 and from 0.508 to 0.940, respectively. Not a single locus showed significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no linkage disequilibrium was observed among any pairwise loci. These highly informative microsat­ellite markers will be useful for genetic diversity and population struc­ture analyses of A. schrenckii and other species of this genus.