Research Article

Molecular variation of Sporisorium scitamineum in Mainland China revealed by internal transcribed spacers

Published: July 14, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 7894-7909 DOI: 10.4238/2015.July.14.15

Abstract

Sugarcane smut caused by the fungus Sporisorium scita­mineum is a worldwide disease and also one of the most prevalent diseases in sugarcane production in mainland China. To study molecular variation in S. scitamineum, 23 S. scitamineum isolates from the 6 primary sugar­cane production areas in mainland, China (Guangxi, Yunnan, Guangdong, Hainan, Fujian, and Jiangxi Provinces), were assessed using internal tran­scribed spacer (ITS) methods. The results of ITS sequence analysis showed that the organisms can be defined at the genus level, including Ustilago and Sporisorium, and can also differentiate between closely related spe­cies. This method was not suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis of different S. scitamineum isolates and could not provide support regarding their race ascription at the molecular level. The results of the present study will be useful for studies examining the molecular diversity of S. scita­mineum and for establishing a genetic foundation for their pathogenicity differentiation and new race detection. In addition, our results can provide useful information for the pathogen selection principle in sugarcane smut resistance breeding and variety distribution.

Sugarcane smut caused by the fungus Sporisorium scita­mineum is a worldwide disease and also one of the most prevalent diseases in sugarcane production in mainland China. To study molecular variation in S. scitamineum, 23 S. scitamineum isolates from the 6 primary sugar­cane production areas in mainland, China (Guangxi, Yunnan, Guangdong, Hainan, Fujian, and Jiangxi Provinces), were assessed using internal tran­scribed spacer (ITS) methods. The results of ITS sequence analysis showed that the organisms can be defined at the genus level, including Ustilago and Sporisorium, and can also differentiate between closely related spe­cies. This method was not suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis of different S. scitamineum isolates and could not provide support regarding their race ascription at the molecular level. The results of the present study will be useful for studies examining the molecular diversity of S. scita­mineum and for establishing a genetic foundation for their pathogenicity differentiation and new race detection. In addition, our results can provide useful information for the pathogen selection principle in sugarcane smut resistance breeding and variety distribution.