Research Article

Meta-analysis of the association between the HNF1B rs4430796 (A>G) polymorphism and risk of prostate cancer based on case-control studies

Published: July 03, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 7426-7435 DOI: 10.4238/2015.July.3.18

Abstract

Genome-wide studies have reported an association between the HNF1B rs4430796 (A>G) polymorphism and prostate cancer risk, but results have been inconsistent and recent meta-analyses have been inadequate. This study aimed to integrate previous results and explore the validity of this association. Electronic searches for all relevant publications through May 18, 2014, were conducted across several databases. Additional studies were identified manually, and only the most recent or complete were used in this meta-analysis. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Seven eligible case-control studies were identified, incorporating a total of 14,049 patients and 12,674 controls. Overall, we found that the rs4430796 (A>G) polymorphism had a decreased risk of prostate cancer (GG vs AA: OR = 0.661, 95%CI = 0.615-0.710, P = 0.304; AG vs AA: OR = 0.782, 95%CI = 0.739-0.828, P = 0.435; dominant model: OR = 0.743, 95%CI = 0.704-0.784, P = 0.912; recessive model: OR = 0.764, 95%CI = 0.718-0.813, P = 0.01). Furthermore, in the stratified analysis, there were significantly decreased risks among studies with population- and hospital-based controls. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significantly decreased risks were also found among Caucasians, Americans, and Asians. Our results suggested that the HNF1B rs4430796 (A>G) polymorphism decreased the risk of prostate cancer. In the future, additional and larger studies on patients from across of the world might be required to validate our findings.

Genome-wide studies have reported an association between the HNF1B rs4430796 (A>G) polymorphism and prostate cancer risk, but results have been inconsistent and recent meta-analyses have been inadequate. This study aimed to integrate previous results and explore the validity of this association. Electronic searches for all relevant publications through May 18, 2014, were conducted across several databases. Additional studies were identified manually, and only the most recent or complete were used in this meta-analysis. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Seven eligible case-control studies were identified, incorporating a total of 14,049 patients and 12,674 controls. Overall, we found that the rs4430796 (A>G) polymorphism had a decreased risk of prostate cancer (GG vs AA: OR = 0.661, 95%CI = 0.615-0.710, P = 0.304; AG vs AA: OR = 0.782, 95%CI = 0.739-0.828, P = 0.435; dominant model: OR = 0.743, 95%CI = 0.704-0.784, P = 0.912; recessive model: OR = 0.764, 95%CI = 0.718-0.813, P = 0.01). Furthermore, in the stratified analysis, there were significantly decreased risks among studies with population- and hospital-based controls. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significantly decreased risks were also found among Caucasians, Americans, and Asians. Our results suggested that the HNF1B rs4430796 (A>G) polymorphism decreased the risk of prostate cancer. In the future, additional and larger studies on patients from across of the world might be required to validate our findings.