Research Article

Identification and expression analysis of YABBY family genes associated with fruit shape in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

Published: June 29, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 7079-7091 DOI: 10.4238/2015.June.29.1

Abstract

YABBY family genes play important roles in the development of leaf, flower, and fruit. The purpose of this research was to integrate all the YABBY genes and analyze the correlation between gene expression and fruit shape in tomato. Scanning of 24 genomes of sequenced species demonstrated that YABBY genes were very normal and stable in flowering plants except the seedless plants. Nine YABBY genes in tomato were computationally and experimentally characterized. The phylogeny was constructed based on whole proteins or the YABBY domain, and five distinct clades were observed as described in other angiosperms. A comparison of the expression patterns in tomatoes with large differences in fruit shape and/or size suggested that during the fruit development, YABBY genes had both negative and positive functions. The obtained information could provide a deeper understanding of the evolution of YABBY genes and can also be useful for tomato yield and shape breeding.

YABBY family genes play important roles in the development of leaf, flower, and fruit. The purpose of this research was to integrate all the YABBY genes and analyze the correlation between gene expression and fruit shape in tomato. Scanning of 24 genomes of sequenced species demonstrated that YABBY genes were very normal and stable in flowering plants except the seedless plants. Nine YABBY genes in tomato were computationally and experimentally characterized. The phylogeny was constructed based on whole proteins or the YABBY domain, and five distinct clades were observed as described in other angiosperms. A comparison of the expression patterns in tomatoes with large differences in fruit shape and/or size suggested that during the fruit development, YABBY genes had both negative and positive functions. The obtained information could provide a deeper understanding of the evolution of YABBY genes and can also be useful for tomato yield and shape breeding.