Research Article

CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism increases cervical neoplasia risk: a meta-analysis

Published: May 18, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 5203-5209 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.May.18.11
Cite this Article:
(2015). CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism increases cervical neoplasia risk: a meta-analysis. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(2): gmr5151. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.May.18.11
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Abstract

Cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) is a key enzyme in the metabolic activation of many carcinogens, but the roles of CYP2E1 polymorphisms in cervical neoplasia (CN) are inconclusive. Published case-control cohort studies from the Pubmed, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were retrieved. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Seven studies examining 1097 cases and 1117 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled effect size showed no association between CYP2E1 RsaI and DraI polymorphisms and CN risk in a codominant model. However, using a recessive model, an association between the PstI polymorphism and CN risk was observed (odds ratio: 2.10, 95% confidence interval: 0.96-4.62, P = 0.06), indicating that individuals with the homozygous rare genotype have a higher risk of developing CN compared to those with homozygous wild-type and heterozygous genotypes. When stratified by ethnicity, the PstI polymorphism was significantly correlated with CN susceptibility in non-Asians (odds ratio: 3.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.13-12.43, P = 0.03). This meta-analysis suggests that the CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism increases the risk of CN in non-Asians.

Cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) is a key enzyme in the metabolic activation of many carcinogens, but the roles of CYP2E1 polymorphisms in cervical neoplasia (CN) are inconclusive. Published case-control cohort studies from the Pubmed, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were retrieved. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Seven studies examining 1097 cases and 1117 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled effect size showed no association between CYP2E1 RsaI and DraI polymorphisms and CN risk in a codominant model. However, using a recessive model, an association between the PstI polymorphism and CN risk was observed (odds ratio: 2.10, 95% confidence interval: 0.96-4.62, P = 0.06), indicating that individuals with the homozygous rare genotype have a higher risk of developing CN compared to those with homozygous wild-type and heterozygous genotypes. When stratified by ethnicity, the PstI polymorphism was significantly correlated with CN susceptibility in non-Asians (odds ratio: 3.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.13-12.43, P = 0.03). This meta-analysis suggests that the CYP2E1 PstI polymorphism increases the risk of CN in non-Asians.

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