Research Article

Effects of analgesia methods on serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels after cesarean delivery

Published: May 11, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 4778-4783 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.May.11.10
Cite this Article:
(2015). Effects of analgesia methods on serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels after cesarean delivery. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(2): gmr5371. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.May.11.10
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Abstract

This study aimed to discuss the effects of 3 different analgesia methods on serum IL-6 and IL-10 in patients after cesarean delivery. Thirty full-term women, who underwent cesarean delivery, were randomly assigned to 3 analgesia groups (10 cases each) as follows: intramuscular injection of 100 mg pethidine (NC group), patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) of 5 mg morphine plus 150 mg ropivacaine (MR group), and patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) of 150 mg sufentanil plus 5 mg droperidol (SF group). An electronic analgesia pump was available in all 3 groups. At 4, 12, 24, and 48 h after surgery, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores were evaluated, IL-6 and IL-10 serum levels were measured, and adverse reactions were documented. The MR and SF groups responded well to analgesia. VAS scores at 12 and 24 h in these 2 groups were significantly lower than those in the NC group (P 0.05), but compared with the NC group, significant differences were observed at 12 and 24 h (P

This study aimed to discuss the effects of 3 different analgesia methods on serum IL-6 and IL-10 in patients after cesarean delivery. Thirty full-term women, who underwent cesarean delivery, were randomly assigned to 3 analgesia groups (10 cases each) as follows: intramuscular injection of 100 mg pethidine (NC group), patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) of 5 mg morphine plus 150 mg ropivacaine (MR group), and patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) of 150 mg sufentanil plus 5 mg droperidol (SF group). An electronic analgesia pump was available in all 3 groups. At 4, 12, 24, and 48 h after surgery, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores were evaluated, IL-6 and IL-10 serum levels were measured, and adverse reactions were documented. The MR and SF groups responded well to analgesia. VAS scores at 12 and 24 h in these 2 groups were significantly lower than those in the NC group (P 0.05), but compared with the NC group, significant differences were observed at 12 and 24 h (P