Research Article

Screening of molecular markers linked to dwarf trait in crape myrtle by bulked segregant analysis

Published: April 30, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 4369-4380 DOI: 10.4238/2015.April.30.10

Abstract

Plant height is one of the most important traits of plant architecture as it modulates both economic and ornamental values. Crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica L.) is a popular ornamental woody plant because of its long-lasting mid-summer bloom, rich colors, and diversified plant architecture. These traits also make it an ideal model of woody species for genetic analysis of many ornamental traits. To understand the inheritance of plant height and screen for genes modulating plant height in Lagerstroemia, segregation of the plant height trait was analyzed using the F1 population of L. fauriei (standard) x L. indica ‘Pocomoke’ (dwarf) with 96 seedlings, while dwarf genes were screened using the bulked segregant analysis method, combined with 28 amplified fragment length polymorphism primers and 41 simple sequence repeat primers. The results showed that the dwarf trait of crape myrtle was controlled by a major gene and modified by minor genes. An amplified fragment length polymorphism marker, M53E39-92, which was 23.33 cM from the loci controlling the dwarf trait, was screened. These results provide basic information for marker-assisted selection in Lagerstromia and cloning of dwarf genes in future studies.

Plant height is one of the most important traits of plant architecture as it modulates both economic and ornamental values. Crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica L.) is a popular ornamental woody plant because of its long-lasting mid-summer bloom, rich colors, and diversified plant architecture. These traits also make it an ideal model of woody species for genetic analysis of many ornamental traits. To understand the inheritance of plant height and screen for genes modulating plant height in Lagerstroemia, segregation of the plant height trait was analyzed using the F1 population of L. fauriei (standard) x L. indica ‘Pocomoke’ (dwarf) with 96 seedlings, while dwarf genes were screened using the bulked segregant analysis method, combined with 28 amplified fragment length polymorphism primers and 41 simple sequence repeat primers. The results showed that the dwarf trait of crape myrtle was controlled by a major gene and modified by minor genes. An amplified fragment length polymorphism marker, M53E39-92, which was 23.33 cM from the loci controlling the dwarf trait, was screened. These results provide basic information for marker-assisted selection in Lagerstromia and cloning of dwarf genes in future studies.