Research Article

Chromosome stickiness impairs meiosis and influences reproductive success in Panicum maximum (Poaceae) hybrid plants

Published: April 28, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 4195-4202 DOI: 10.4238/2015.April.28.2

Abstract

Chromosome stickiness has been studied in several species of higher plants and is characterized by sticky clumps of chromatin resulting in sterility. Chromosome stickiness was recorded in Panicum maximum hybrid plants that were cultivated in the field. In the meiocytes affected, chromosomes clumped into amorphous masses that did not orient themselves on the equatorial plate, and anaphase I disjunction failed to occur. After a normal cytokinesis, the masses of chromatin were divided between both daughter cells. Metaphase and anaphase of the second division also did not occur, and after the second cytokinesis, polyads were formed. This abnormality arose spontaneously. Abnormalities that cause male sterility are an important tool for obtaining hybrid seeds in plant breeding. This is the first report of an abnormality affecting pollen viability in P. maximum. This finding can open a new opportunity in the breeding program of this species that is devoted to hybridization where manual cross-pollination is difficult and time consuming.

Chromosome stickiness has been studied in several species of higher plants and is characterized by sticky clumps of chromatin resulting in sterility. Chromosome stickiness was recorded in Panicum maximum hybrid plants that were cultivated in the field. In the meiocytes affected, chromosomes clumped into amorphous masses that did not orient themselves on the equatorial plate, and anaphase I disjunction failed to occur. After a normal cytokinesis, the masses of chromatin were divided between both daughter cells. Metaphase and anaphase of the second division also did not occur, and after the second cytokinesis, polyads were formed. This abnormality arose spontaneously. Abnormalities that cause male sterility are an important tool for obtaining hybrid seeds in plant breeding. This is the first report of an abnormality affecting pollen viability in P. maximum. This finding can open a new opportunity in the breeding program of this species that is devoted to hybridization where manual cross-pollination is difficult and time consuming.

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