Research Article

Benefits of minimizing immunosuppressive dosage according to cytochrome P450 3A5 genotype in liver transplant patients: findings from a single-center study

Published: April 10, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 3191-3199 DOI: 10.4238/2015.April.10.31

Abstract

We evaluated the clinical efficacy of tailoring tacrolimus dosage to cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5 genotype in liver transplant patients. One hundred patients who received tacrolimus-based therapy were included in the retrospective study in which the relationship between the tacrolimus blood trough concentration/dosage ratio and the CYP3A5 genotype of both donors and recipients was determined. Subsequently, 106 patients were continuously enrolled in a prospective study and followed-up for 6 months; the relationship between tacrolimus dosage and CYP3A5 genotype was also determined. Rates of acute rejection, hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, and hyperglycemia were compared between the groups. During the 6 months following liver transplantation, the mean tacrolimus concentration/dosage ratio among patients who did not have the CYP3A5*1 genotype and who received a transplant from a donor with the same genotype (24/100, 24% of patients) was higher than that among patients who did have the CYP3A5*1 genotype and/or had a donor with the same genotype (76/100, 76% of patients). In the second part of the study, the tacrolimus dosage was tailored to CYP3A5 genotype and 24 patients (22.64%) received a lower dose. There was an obvious decrease in acute rejection, hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and Pneumocystis carinii infection among the latter group. A lower tacrolimus dose was suitable for about 25% of the liver transplant patients, as these patients did not have the CYP3A5*1 genotype and received a transplant from a donor with the same genotype. Tailoring the tacrolimus dosage according to the CYP3A5 genotype could reduce rejection and adverse effects.

We evaluated the clinical efficacy of tailoring tacrolimus dosage to cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5 genotype in liver transplant patients. One hundred patients who received tacrolimus-based therapy were included in the retrospective study in which the relationship between the tacrolimus blood trough concentration/dosage ratio and the CYP3A5 genotype of both donors and recipients was determined. Subsequently, 106 patients were continuously enrolled in a prospective study and followed-up for 6 months; the relationship between tacrolimus dosage and CYP3A5 genotype was also determined. Rates of acute rejection, hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, and hyperglycemia were compared between the groups. During the 6 months following liver transplantation, the mean tacrolimus concentration/dosage ratio among patients who did not have the CYP3A5*1 genotype and who received a transplant from a donor with the same genotype (24/100, 24% of patients) was higher than that among patients who did have the CYP3A5*1 genotype and/or had a donor with the same genotype (76/100, 76% of patients). In the second part of the study, the tacrolimus dosage was tailored to CYP3A5 genotype and 24 patients (22.64%) received a lower dose. There was an obvious decrease in acute rejection, hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and Pneumocystis carinii infection among the latter group. A lower tacrolimus dose was suitable for about 25% of the liver transplant patients, as these patients did not have the CYP3A5*1 genotype and received a transplant from a donor with the same genotype. Tailoring the tacrolimus dosage according to the CYP3A5 genotype could reduce rejection and adverse effects.

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