Research Article

Postpartum pelvic floor function performance after two different modes of delivery

Published: April 10, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 2994-3001 DOI: 10.4238/2015.April.10.9

Abstract

This study investigated the incidences of urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse as well as pelvic floor muscle strength after cesarean section and vaginal delivery. From June 2010 to July 2011, 149 puerpera in Shenzhen Hospital, Peking University, were divided into the cesarean section group (N = 66) and the vaginal delivery group (N = 83). Postpartum urinary incontinence analysis, pelvic examination, and pelvic muscle contraction analysis using the PHENIX neuromuscular therapy instrument were performed to compare urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and pelvic floor muscle condition between the 2 groups. The incidences of urinary incontinence in the cesarean and vaginal delivery groups were 9.09% (6/66) and 16.87% (14/83), respectively (P > 0.05); the incidences of pelvic organ prolapse were 53.03% (35/66) and 86.75% (72/83), respectively (P 0.05). Hence, cesarean section has a protective effect on early postpartum pelvic organ prolapse, but the delivery modes do not differ significantly with respect to the incidence of postpartum urinary incontinence or pelvic muscle floor muscle strength.

This study investigated the incidences of urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse as well as pelvic floor muscle strength after cesarean section and vaginal delivery. From June 2010 to July 2011, 149 puerpera in Shenzhen Hospital, Peking University, were divided into the cesarean section group (N = 66) and the vaginal delivery group (N = 83). Postpartum urinary incontinence analysis, pelvic examination, and pelvic muscle contraction analysis using the PHENIX neuromuscular therapy instrument were performed to compare urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and pelvic floor muscle condition between the 2 groups. The incidences of urinary incontinence in the cesarean and vaginal delivery groups were 9.09% (6/66) and 16.87% (14/83), respectively (P > 0.05); the incidences of pelvic organ prolapse were 53.03% (35/66) and 86.75% (72/83), respectively (P 0.05). Hence, cesarean section has a protective effect on early postpartum pelvic organ prolapse, but the delivery modes do not differ significantly with respect to the incidence of postpartum urinary incontinence or pelvic muscle floor muscle strength.