Research Article

Risk factors for damaged liver function after chemotherapy in hepatitis B virus carriers with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Published: March 30, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (1) : 2647-2653 DOI: 10.4238/2015.March.30.25

Abstract

The goal of this study was to investigate damaged liver function after chemotherapy in hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and to evaluate risk factors associated with a high risk of damaged liver function. Clinical histories of 134 HBV carriers with NHL who were treated with chemotherapy were obtained and analyzed for the occurrence of damaged liver function and other related high-risk factors. Analysis showed that 76 patients (56.7%) had damaged liver function after chemotherapy: 6 patients (7.9%) had I degree, 17 patients (22.4%) had II degree, 20 patients (26.3%) had III degree, and 33 patients (43.4%) had IV degree damage. After treatment, 18 patients (23.7%) continued to receive chemotherapy according to their original schedule, 39 patients (51.3%) delayed chemotherapy, 16 patients (21.1%) stopped chemotherapy, and 3 patients (3.9%) died. Analysis of a binary multivariate logistic regression model showed that administration of steroids was a high-risk factor for damaged liver function after chemotherapy in NHL patients. The incidence of damaged liver function after chemotherapy is high among HBV carriers with NHL; therefore, administration of steroid chemotherapy is a high-risk factor.

The goal of this study was to investigate damaged liver function after chemotherapy in hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and to evaluate risk factors associated with a high risk of damaged liver function. Clinical histories of 134 HBV carriers with NHL who were treated with chemotherapy were obtained and analyzed for the occurrence of damaged liver function and other related high-risk factors. Analysis showed that 76 patients (56.7%) had damaged liver function after chemotherapy: 6 patients (7.9%) had I degree, 17 patients (22.4%) had II degree, 20 patients (26.3%) had III degree, and 33 patients (43.4%) had IV degree damage. After treatment, 18 patients (23.7%) continued to receive chemotherapy according to their original schedule, 39 patients (51.3%) delayed chemotherapy, 16 patients (21.1%) stopped chemotherapy, and 3 patients (3.9%) died. Analysis of a binary multivariate logistic regression model showed that administration of steroids was a high-risk factor for damaged liver function after chemotherapy in NHL patients. The incidence of damaged liver function after chemotherapy is high among HBV carriers with NHL; therefore, administration of steroid chemotherapy is a high-risk factor.