Research Article

Establishment of the genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique for analysis in interspecific hybrids of Passiflora

Published: March 27, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (1) : 2176-2188 DOI: 10.4238/2015.March.27.4

Abstract

The genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique was applied to Passiflora interspecific F1 HD13-133 hybrids (Passiflora sublanceolata x Passiflora foetida) and HD15-101 (Passiflora gardineri x Passiflora gibertii), and the backcrossed hybrids (BC1) HD18-106 and HD18-113 (Passiflora sublanceolata x HD13-133). GISH was performed using genomic probes prepared with the DNA from the paternal genitor, whereas the maternal DNA was used as blocking DNA and employed at various concentrations (20X, 40X, 60X, and 100X) in relation to the probe concentration. At the same time, GISH was applied with the use of simultaneous probes from both genomes, paternal and maternal, that were detected with avidin-FITC and anti-digoxigenin-rhodamine, respectively. Both methodologies allowed the distinguishing of the maternal and paternal genomes, thus confirming the hybrid nature of all the analyzed genotypes. Furthermore, the presence of recombinant chromosomes in BC1 hybrids revealed the occurrence of meiotic recombination in HD13 hybrids. This application of the GISH technique is an important step towards genomic analyses of Passiflora hybrids: it can broaden the phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of the genus and, at the same time, contribute to breeding programs.

The genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique was applied to Passiflora interspecific F1 HD13-133 hybrids (Passiflora sublanceolata x Passiflora foetida) and HD15-101 (Passiflora gardineri x Passiflora gibertii), and the backcrossed hybrids (BC1) HD18-106 and HD18-113 (Passiflora sublanceolata x HD13-133). GISH was performed using genomic probes prepared with the DNA from the paternal genitor, whereas the maternal DNA was used as blocking DNA and employed at various concentrations (20X, 40X, 60X, and 100X) in relation to the probe concentration. At the same time, GISH was applied with the use of simultaneous probes from both genomes, paternal and maternal, that were detected with avidin-FITC and anti-digoxigenin-rhodamine, respectively. Both methodologies allowed the distinguishing of the maternal and paternal genomes, thus confirming the hybrid nature of all the analyzed genotypes. Furthermore, the presence of recombinant chromosomes in BC1 hybrids revealed the occurrence of meiotic recombination in HD13 hybrids. This application of the GISH technique is an important step towards genomic analyses of Passiflora hybrids: it can broaden the phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of the genus and, at the same time, contribute to breeding programs.

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