Research Article

Changes in hippocampal ultrastructure and vimentin expression in rhesus monkeys following selective deep hypothermia and blood occlusion

Published: January 30, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (1) : 651-658 DOI: 10.4238/2015.January.30.7

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that selective cerebral profound hypothermia combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion can improve resistance to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in monkeys. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of selective cerebral profound hypothermia on the ultrastructure and vimentin expression in monkey hippocampi after severe cerebral ischemia. Eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomly divided into two groups: profound hypothermia (N = 5) and normothermia (N = 3). Monkeys in the profound hypothermia group underwent bilateral carotid artery and jugular vein occlusion for 10 minutes at room temperature. Ringer’s solution at 4°C was then perfused through the right internal carotid artery and out of the right jugular vein, maintaining the brain temperature below 18°C. Sixty minutes later, cerebral blood flow was restored. The normothermia group underwent all procedures with the exception that the Ringer’s solution was 37°C during perfusion. All animals in the profound hypothermia group were successfully resuscitated. No significant abnormalities of hippocampal morphology or ultrastructure were observed. In contrast, no monkeys were alive after perfusion in the normothermia group and they had abnormal hippocampal morphology and ultrastructure to different extents. Vimentin expression in the hippocampus was significantly lower in the profound hypothermia group (47.88% ± 1.66) than the normothermia group (79.51% ± 1.00; P

Previous studies have shown that selective cerebral profound hypothermia combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion can improve resistance to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in monkeys. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of selective cerebral profound hypothermia on the ultrastructure and vimentin expression in monkey hippocampi after severe cerebral ischemia. Eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomly divided into two groups: profound hypothermia (N = 5) and normothermia (N = 3). Monkeys in the profound hypothermia group underwent bilateral carotid artery and jugular vein occlusion for 10 minutes at room temperature. Ringer’s solution at 4°C was then perfused through the right internal carotid artery and out of the right jugular vein, maintaining the brain temperature below 18°C. Sixty minutes later, cerebral blood flow was restored. The normothermia group underwent all procedures with the exception that the Ringer’s solution was 37°C during perfusion. All animals in the profound hypothermia group were successfully resuscitated. No significant abnormalities of hippocampal morphology or ultrastructure were observed. In contrast, no monkeys were alive after perfusion in the normothermia group and they had abnormal hippocampal morphology and ultrastructure to different extents. Vimentin expression in the hippocampus was significantly lower in the profound hypothermia group (47.88% ± 1.66) than the normothermia group (79.51% ± 1.00; P