Research Article

Germline mutations of DICER1 in Chinese women with BRCA1/BRCA2-negative familial breast cancer

Published: December 18, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (4) : 10754-10760 DOI: 10.4238/2014.December.18.16

Abstract

Germline mutations in identified breast cancer susceptibility genes account for less than 20% of Chinese familial breast cancers. Dicer is an essential component of the microRNA-producing machinery; germline mutations of DICER1 have been confirmed in familial pleuropulmonary blastoma, ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, and other cancers. Low expression of DICER1 is frequently detected in breast cancer. However, whether germline mutations of DICER1 occur in familial breast cancers remain unknown. Sixty-five breast cancer probands from BRCA1/BRCA2-negative Chinese breast cancer families were screened for germline mutations in DICER1. In addition, 100 unrelated healthy females were enrolled as controls. A polymerase chain reaction sequencing assay was used to screen for mutations in coding regions and at the exon-intron boundaries of DICER1. All variants in introns were evaluated using the NNSplice software to determine the potential splicing effect. A total of 12 germline variants were found, including 11 variants in introns and 1 variant in the 3'-non-coding region. Four variants (IVS8-205 C>T, IVS11+131 delGAAA, IVS16+42 delTA, and IVS19+160 T>C) were novel. Three variants (IVS11+105 C>T, IVS16+42 delTA, and 6095 T>A) may affect splice sites. None of the observed variants appeared to be disease-related, suggesting that germline mutations in DICER1 are rare or absent in familial breast cancer patients.

Germline mutations in identified breast cancer susceptibility genes account for less than 20% of Chinese familial breast cancers. Dicer is an essential component of the microRNA-producing machinery; germline mutations of DICER1 have been confirmed in familial pleuropulmonary blastoma, ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, and other cancers. Low expression of DICER1 is frequently detected in breast cancer. However, whether germline mutations of DICER1 occur in familial breast cancers remain unknown. Sixty-five breast cancer probands from BRCA1/BRCA2-negative Chinese breast cancer families were screened for germline mutations in DICER1. In addition, 100 unrelated healthy females were enrolled as controls. A polymerase chain reaction sequencing assay was used to screen for mutations in coding regions and at the exon-intron boundaries of DICER1. All variants in introns were evaluated using the NNSplice software to determine the potential splicing effect. A total of 12 germline variants were found, including 11 variants in introns and 1 variant in the 3'-non-coding region. Four variants (IVS8-205 C>T, IVS11+131 delGAAA, IVS16+42 delTA, and IVS19+160 T>C) were novel. Three variants (IVS11+105 C>T, IVS16+42 delTA, and 6095 T>A) may affect splice sites. None of the observed variants appeared to be disease-related, suggesting that germline mutations in DICER1 are rare or absent in familial breast cancer patients.