Research Article

Analysis of signaling pathways in recurrent breast cancer

Published: December 04, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (4) : 10097-10104 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.December.4.4
Cite this Article:
(2014). Analysis of signaling pathways in recurrent breast cancer. Genet. Mol. Res. 13(4): gmr3872. https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.December.4.4
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Abstract

Breast cancer remains the second largest cause of death in women from cancer. By analyzing gene expression profiles in samples from breast cancer patients, 844 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in breast cancer metastasis. The 10 most significant signaling pathways identified through enrichment analysis contained DEGs were involved in oxidative phosphorylation, DNA replication, extracellular matrix-receptor interactions and others. Furthermore, survival analysis demonstrated that 5 of these signaling pathways were closely related to the survival time of breast cancer patients including basal transcription factors, cell cycle, ECM-receptor interaction, spliceosome, and DNA replication. Our findings increase the understanding of the network of signaling pathways involved in breast cancer metastasis and may provide theoretical support for further therapeutic study.

Breast cancer remains the second largest cause of death in women from cancer. By analyzing gene expression profiles in samples from breast cancer patients, 844 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in breast cancer metastasis. The 10 most significant signaling pathways identified through enrichment analysis contained DEGs were involved in oxidative phosphorylation, DNA replication, extracellular matrix-receptor interactions and others. Furthermore, survival analysis demonstrated that 5 of these signaling pathways were closely related to the survival time of breast cancer patients including basal transcription factors, cell cycle, ECM-receptor interaction, spliceosome, and DNA replication. Our findings increase the understanding of the network of signaling pathways involved in breast cancer metastasis and may provide theoretical support for further therapeutic study.

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