Research Article

Transferability of microsatellites for studies on the social behavior of the tufted capuchin monkey (genus Sapajus)

Published: November 27, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (4) : 9910-9914 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.November.27.19
Cite this Article:
(2014). Transferability of microsatellites for studies on the social behavior of the tufted capuchin monkey (genus Sapajus). Genet. Mol. Res. 13(4): gmr4224. https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.November.27.19
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Abstract

Because of relevant results that indicated that molecular techniques can provide increased knowledge of animal social systems, they usually complement observational field studies. Despite the great utility of microsatellites, they are not available for all species. Gathering genetic information using microsatellites that were originally designed for other species is a time-saving procedure. The aim of this study was to test the transferability of microsatellites and their usefulness in studies of social behavior of black capuchin monkeys (Sapajus nigritus). We noninvasively sampled adult and subadult black capuchins of three wild groups in southeastern Brazil. Seventeen microsatellites, which were previously designed for and successfully amplified in multiple Neotropical primate species, were tested. Nine of the 17 microsatellite loci tested produced an average of 6.22 alleles (range 2-12) per locus. The allelic richness and the expected heterozygosity for all loci was 5.93 and 0.70, respectively. The combined non-exclusion probability for one candidate parent across all loci was 0.01. The nine microsatellite loci optimized in this study have a great potential for application in studies of social structure and dispersal patterns in S. nigritus populations and in other Neotropical primate species.

Because of relevant results that indicated that molecular techniques can provide increased knowledge of animal social systems, they usually complement observational field studies. Despite the great utility of microsatellites, they are not available for all species. Gathering genetic information using microsatellites that were originally designed for other species is a time-saving procedure. The aim of this study was to test the transferability of microsatellites and their usefulness in studies of social behavior of black capuchin monkeys (Sapajus nigritus). We noninvasively sampled adult and subadult black capuchins of three wild groups in southeastern Brazil. Seventeen microsatellites, which were previously designed for and successfully amplified in multiple Neotropical primate species, were tested. Nine of the 17 microsatellite loci tested produced an average of 6.22 alleles (range 2-12) per locus. The allelic richness and the expected heterozygosity for all loci was 5.93 and 0.70, respectively. The combined non-exclusion probability for one candidate parent across all loci was 0.01. The nine microsatellite loci optimized in this study have a great potential for application in studies of social structure and dispersal patterns in S. nigritus populations and in other Neotropical primate species.

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