Research Article

Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism and susceptibility to systemic sclerosis: a meta-analysis

Published: October 07, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (4) : 8174-8183 DOI: 10.4238/2014.October.7.12

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine whether the insertion (I) or deletion (D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE) is associated with susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc). A meta-analysis examining the associations between the ACE I/D polymorphism and SSc was conducted in overall and European populations using 1) allelic contrast (D vs I); 2) recessive (DD vs ID + II); 3) dominant (DD + ID vs II); and 4) additive (DD vs ID vs II) models. A total of 7 studies consisting of 837 cases and 754 controls were available for meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed no association between the D allele and SSc in any study subjects [odds ratio (OR) = 0.956, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.733-1.246, P = 0.737]. Stratification by ethnicity indicated no association between the D allele of the ACE I/D polymorphism and SSc in Europeans (OR = 1.117, 95%CI = 0.776-1.607, P = 0.551). Meta-analysis using all other genetic models showed the same D allele pattern in the overall and European groups. This meta-analysis showed that the ACE I/D polymorphism was not associated with susceptibility to SSc in the study subjects and in Europeans.

The purpose of this study was to examine whether the insertion (I) or deletion (D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE) is associated with susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc). A meta-analysis examining the associations between the ACE I/D polymorphism and SSc was conducted in overall and European populations using 1) allelic contrast (D vs I); 2) recessive (DD vs ID + II); 3) dominant (DD + ID vs II); and 4) additive (DD vs ID vs II) models. A total of 7 studies consisting of 837 cases and 754 controls were available for meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed no association between the D allele and SSc in any study subjects [odds ratio (OR) = 0.956, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.733-1.246, P = 0.737]. Stratification by ethnicity indicated no association between the D allele of the ACE I/D polymorphism and SSc in Europeans (OR = 1.117, 95%CI = 0.776-1.607, P = 0.551). Meta-analysis using all other genetic models showed the same D allele pattern in the overall and European groups. This meta-analysis showed that the ACE I/D polymorphism was not associated with susceptibility to SSc in the study subjects and in Europeans.

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