Research Article

Isolation, characterization, and cross-transferability of microsatellite markers from the whitebacked planthopper (Sogatella furcifera)

Published: August 15, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (3) : 6248-6252 DOI: 10.4238/2014.August.15.7

Abstract

The whitebacked planthopper Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) is one of the most harmful pests of rice. In this study, 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed from S. furcifera genomic libraries using the fast isolation by amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeat protocols. Microsatellite polymorphism was investigated using 32 individuals from one natural population. These 18 simple sequence repeat markers showed a number of alleles that ranged from 3 to 15 and had observed and expected heterozygosities that ranged from 0.094 to 0.871 and from 0.148 to 0.924, respectively. The high cross-species transferability of these markers was evaluated in three other planthopper species: Nilaparvata lugens, N. muiri China, and N. bakeri (Muir). These microsatellite markers will provide powerful tools for population genetic and ecological studies of this pest and its related species in the future.

The whitebacked planthopper Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) is one of the most harmful pests of rice. In this study, 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed from S. furcifera genomic libraries using the fast isolation by amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeat protocols. Microsatellite polymorphism was investigated using 32 individuals from one natural population. These 18 simple sequence repeat markers showed a number of alleles that ranged from 3 to 15 and had observed and expected heterozygosities that ranged from 0.094 to 0.871 and from 0.148 to 0.924, respectively. The high cross-species transferability of these markers was evaluated in three other planthopper species: Nilaparvata lugens, N. muiri China, and N. bakeri (Muir). These microsatellite markers will provide powerful tools for population genetic and ecological studies of this pest and its related species in the future.