Research Article

Repeated whole-lung lavage for unremitting pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a eight-year follow-up of a case

Published: August 07, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (3) : 6135-6141 DOI: 10.4238/2014.August.7.29

Abstract

Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare clinical syndrome that was first described in 1958. To date, whole-lung lavage (WLL) is still the gold-standard therapy for PAP. Herein, we report the case of a male patient who was diagnosed with PAP by open-lung biopsy 8 years prior to presentation at our clinic. The man underwent his first WLL in 2004 and showed marked clinical and radiological improvement after the operation. However, after his original presentation, proteinaceous material continued to accumulate in his lungs. Lavage was performed four additional times, but these attempts failed to arrest the decline in pulmonary function. Each lavage resulted in significant, although transient, clinical improvement.

Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare clinical syndrome that was first described in 1958. To date, whole-lung lavage (WLL) is still the gold-standard therapy for PAP. Herein, we report the case of a male patient who was diagnosed with PAP by open-lung biopsy 8 years prior to presentation at our clinic. The man underwent his first WLL in 2004 and showed marked clinical and radiological improvement after the operation. However, after his original presentation, proteinaceous material continued to accumulate in his lungs. Lavage was performed four additional times, but these attempts failed to arrest the decline in pulmonary function. Each lavage resulted in significant, although transient, clinical improvement.