Research Article

Treatment of seawater immersion-complicated open-knee joint fracture

Published: July 25, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (3) : 5523-5533 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.July.25.6
Cite this Article:
(2014). Treatment of seawater immersion-complicated open-knee joint fracture. Genet. Mol. Res. 13(3): gmr3628. https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.July.25.6
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Abstract

The current study aimed to select suitable remedies for seawater immersion-complicated open-knee joint fracture by exploring the effects of different treatment methods. Forty adult rabbits weighing 2.20 ± 0.25 kg were divided equally into internal fracture fixation group (A), seawater-immersed group with primary internal fixation (B), seawater-immersed group with secondary internal fixation (C), and seawater-immersed group with external fixation (D), using the random-digit table method. Open-femoral internal condylar fracture models were established. Group A was left untreated for 2 h, whereas the other three groups were subjected to seawater immersion for 2 h. Afterwards, groups A and B underwent debridement and steel plate and screw internal fixation. Group C underwent debridement and external fixation, which was followed by secondary steel plate and screw internal fixation after the wound healed. Group D underwent transarticular arthrodesis. Wound infection, joint functional rehabilitation, and radiological and histopathological changes in fracture healing in each group were assessed. The results showed that delayed internal fixation effectively reduces the infection rate of seawater immersion-complicated open fracture and benefits joint function rehabilitation.

The current study aimed to select suitable remedies for seawater immersion-complicated open-knee joint fracture by exploring the effects of different treatment methods. Forty adult rabbits weighing 2.20 ± 0.25 kg were divided equally into internal fracture fixation group (A), seawater-immersed group with primary internal fixation (B), seawater-immersed group with secondary internal fixation (C), and seawater-immersed group with external fixation (D), using the random-digit table method. Open-femoral internal condylar fracture models were established. Group A was left untreated for 2 h, whereas the other three groups were subjected to seawater immersion for 2 h. Afterwards, groups A and B underwent debridement and steel plate and screw internal fixation. Group C underwent debridement and external fixation, which was followed by secondary steel plate and screw internal fixation after the wound healed. Group D underwent transarticular arthrodesis. Wound infection, joint functional rehabilitation, and radiological and histopathological changes in fracture healing in each group were assessed. The results showed that delayed internal fixation effectively reduces the infection rate of seawater immersion-complicated open fracture and benefits joint function rehabilitation.