Research Article

Vitamin D receptor genetic variants are associated with susceptibility of gallbladder adenocarcinoma in a Chinese cohort

Published: July 24, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (3) : 5387-5394 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.July.24.18
Cite this Article:
(2014). Vitamin D receptor genetic variants are associated with susceptibility of gallbladder adenocarcinoma in a Chinese cohort. Genet. Mol. Res. 13(3): gmr3529. https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.July.24.18
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to test for the possible association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) genetic variants and susceptibility to gallbladder cancer (GBC). A total of 291 GBC cases were recruited and 396 gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled as controls. The VDR gene polymorphisms were determined in all subjects. The genotype and the allele frequencies of ApaI, BsmI, and TaqI polymorphisms were not significantly different between GBC subjects and controls. However, the genotype and allele frequencies of the FokI C>T polymorphism were significantly different between GBC subjects and controls. The FokI TT genotype was in markedly higher frequency in GBC subjects compared to controls (38.14 vs 22.73%, P ApaI, BsmI, and TaqI polymorphisms and GBC risk (all P > 0.05).

The aim of this study was to test for the possible association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) genetic variants and susceptibility to gallbladder cancer (GBC). A total of 291 GBC cases were recruited and 396 gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled as controls. The VDR gene polymorphisms were determined in all subjects. The genotype and the allele frequencies of ApaI, BsmI, and TaqI polymorphisms were not significantly different between GBC subjects and controls. However, the genotype and allele frequencies of the FokI C>T polymorphism were significantly different between GBC subjects and controls. The FokI TT genotype was in markedly higher frequency in GBC subjects compared to controls (38.14 vs 22.73%, P ApaI, BsmI, and TaqI polymorphisms and GBC risk (all P > 0.05).

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